macOS

#CASBAN6: How to set up a local Microsoft SQL database on macOS

#CASBAN6: How to set up a local Microsoft SQL database on macOS

Microsoft’s SQL Server cannot be installed directly on macOS, like on Windows machines. Luckily, there is a not so complicated solution using a Docker container – provided by Microsoft themselves.

Install Docker

Obviously, the first step is to download Docker and install it on your Mac. Just head over to the Docker website and download the appropriate version. Install the app by opening the disk image and follow the instructions.

Install SQL Server

After installing the Docker desktop client, head over to the docker hub of Microsoft’s SQL Server. You can choose between SQL Server 2017, 2019 and 2022, with the latter one being preview (as of publishing time of this post). To download the image, we need to open a terminal and download it with the pull command:

sudo docker pull mcr.microsoft.com/mssql/server:2019-latest

I am selecting 2019 here as it is closest to what Azure SQL databases uses as of publishing time of this post.

Create a server instance

Microsoft makes it quite easy to create a server instance, we just need to copy the appropriate run command from the docker hub website. I am using SQL Server Express for my testing purposes:

 docker run -e 'ACCEPT_EULA=Y' -e 'SA_PASSWORD=thisShouldB3Stronger!' -e 'MSSQL_PID=Express' -p 1433:1433 --name mssql  -d mcr.microsoft.com/mssql/server:2019-latest

Once you run this command without any error, type in docker ps to verify the image is up and running. If all goes well, you should see something like this:

Create a database

Now that we have a running server instance, we can finally create a database for our purposes. We are using this terminal command to achieve our goal:

docker exec -i mssql /opt/mssql-tools/bin/sqlcmd -S localhost -U SA -P 'thisShouldB3Stronger!' -Q 'CREATE DATABASE localDB'

We are logging into our server with this and send the command to create our database. Alternatively, we could already connect using DBeaver(link below) to create the Database. In both cases, we have our local database up and running by now.

Connect

There are several ways to connect to this database. The one we are going to use with Entity Framework Core is the good old connection string:

//template: Data Source=localhost;Initial Catalog=<database>;User ID=sa;Password=<password>

Data Source=localhost;Initial Catalog=localDB;User ID=sa;Password=thisShouldB3Stronger!

If you want to access your database with a GUI, I recommend using either Visual Studio Code with the Azure and SQL workload installed or the Community Edition of DBeaver.

DBeaver Community screenshot

Visual Studio allows connecting on a database level, while DBeaver can be used to connect at server level as well. Both of them also support access to Azure SQL databases, which will be helpful later on.

Conclusion

Microsoft’s SQL Server is not available for macOS. Nonetheless, we are able to quickly set up a Docker container that runs MS SQL and set up a local database for testing. I wrote this post for completeness of the series.

Useful links

Until the next post – happy coding, everyone!

Posted by msicc in Azure, Database, Dev Stories, 3 comments
#CASBAN6: Creating A Serverless Blog on Azure with .NET 6 (new series)

#CASBAN6: Creating A Serverless Blog on Azure with .NET 6 (new series)

Motivation

I was planning to run my blog without WordPress for quite some time. For one, because WordPress is really blown up as a platform. The second reason is more of a practical nature – this project gives me lots of stuff to improve my programming skills. I already started to move my developer website away from WordPress with ASP.NET CORE and Razor Pages. Eventually I arrived at the point where I needed to implement a blog engine for the news section. So, I have two websites (including this one here) that will take advantage of the outcome of this journey.

High Level Architecture

Now that the ‘why’ is clear, let’s have a look at the ‘how’:

There are several layers in my concept. The data layer consists of a serverless MS SQL instance on Azure, on which I will work with the help of Entity Framework Core and Azure Functions for all the CRUD operations of the blog. I will use the powers of Azure API Management, which will allow me to provide a secure layer for the clients – of course, an ASP.NET CORE Website with RazorPages, flanked by a .NET MAUI admin client (no web administration). Once the former two are done, I will also add a mobile client for this blog. It will be the next major update for my existing blog reader that is already in the app stores.

For comments, I will use Disqus. This way, I have a proven comment system where anyone can use his/her favorite account to participate in discussions. They also have an API, so there is a good chance that I will be able to implement Disqus in the Desktop and Mobile clients.

Last but not least, there are (for now) two open points – performance measuring/logging and notifications. I haven’t decided yet how to implement these – but I guess there will be an Azure based implementation as well (until there are good reasons to use another service).

Open Source

Most of the software I will write and blog about in this series will be available publicly on GitHub. You can find the repository already there, including stuff for the next two upcoming blog posts already in there.

Index

I will update this blog post regularly with a link new entries of the series.

Additional note

Please note that I am working on this in my spare time. This may result in delays between the blog posts and the updates committed into the repository on GitHub. On top, I also have to split my spare time between my other side project (TwistReader) and this one (3 days a week for each). Whenever necessary, either one of the projects can take precedence over the other, so be aware – and please understand.

Until the next post – happy coding, everyone!


Title Image by Roman from Pixabay

Posted by msicc in Android, Azure, Dev Stories, iOS, MAUI, Web, 1 comment
Fix ‘Xcode is not currently installed or could not be found’ error in Visual Studio 2019 for Mac

Fix ‘Xcode is not currently installed or could not be found’ error in Visual Studio 2019 for Mac

Every now and then, our IDE’s get some updates. This week, Visual Studio for MacOS got updated once again. After that, there was a separated Download initiated for the Xcode Command Line Tools. Two days later, Visual Studio started to greet me with this little message:

Xcode missing message VS Mac

Of course, I checked first that my installed version of Xcode is still working – it stopped already for me some time ago and I had to reinstall it. As you can see, that was not the case:

Xcode 12.5 about window

After doing some research on the web, others had similar issues. The problem was that the installation of the Xcode CLI tools has overridden the location of Xcode in Preferences – as you can see in the

The fix is easy, just paste /Applications/Xcode.app/ into the location field. Please note that the trailing slash is also important:

The dialog will immediately verify the existence of Xcode (at least in version 8.9.10). Just hit that restart button and you are once again good to go.

As always, I hope this short post will be helpful for some of you.

Until the next post – happy coding, everyone.

Posted by msicc in Dev Stories, iOS, Xamarin, 3 comments