API

Simple helper method to detect the last page of API data (C#)

When you are working with APIs from web services, you probably ran already into the same problem that I did recently: how to detect if we are on the last page of possible API results.

Some APIs (like WordPress) use tokens to be sent as parameter  with your request, and if the token is null or empty you know that you have reached the last page. However, not all APIs are working that way (for example UserVoice).

As I am rewriting Voices Admin to be a Universal app, I came up with a simple but effective helper method that allows me to easily detect if I am on the last page. Here is what I did:

	public static bool IsLastPage(int total, int countperpage, int current)
        {
            bool value = false;

            if (current < Convert.ToInt32(Math.Ceiling(Convert.ToDouble(total)/countperpage)))
            {
                value = false;
            }

            if (current == Convert.ToInt32(Math.Ceiling(Convert.ToDouble(total)/countperpage)))
                value = true;

            return value;
        }

As you can see, I need the number of total records that can be fetched (which is returned by the API) and the property for the number per page (which is one of the optional parameters of the API). On top, I need the current page number to calculate where I am (which is also an optional parameter of the API and returned by the API result).

Now I simply need to divide the total records by the result count per page to get how many pages are used. Using the Math.Ceiling() method, I always get the correct number of pages back. What does the Math.Ceiling() method do? It just jumps up to the next absolute number, also known as “rounding toward positive infinity”.

Example: if you have 51 total records and a per page count of 10, the division will return 5.1 (which means there is only one result on the 6th page). However, we need an absolute number. Rounding the result would return 5 pages, which is wrong in this case. The Math.Ceiling() method however returns the correct value of 6.

Setting the method up as a static Boolean makes it easy to change the CanExecute property of a button for example, which will be automatically disabled if we just have loaded the last page (page 6 in my case).

As always, I hope this is helpful for some of you.

Happy coding, everyone!

Posted by msicc in Dev Stories, windev, 2 comments

Detect and remove Emojis from Text on Windows Phone

noemoticonskeyboard

In my recent project, I work with a lot of text that get’s its value from user input. To enable the best possible experience for my users, I choose the InputScope Text on all TextBoxes, because it provides the word suggestions while writing.

The Text will be submitted to a webserver via a REST API. And now the problem starts. The emojis that are part of the Windows Phone OS are not supported by the API and the webserver.

Of course, I was immediately looking for a way to get around this. I thought this might be helpful for some of you, so I am sharing two little helper methods for detecting and removing the emojis .

After publishing the first version of this post, I got some feedback that made me investigating a bit more on this topic.  The emojis are so called unicode symbols, and thanks to the Unicode behind it, they are compatible with all platforms that have the matching Unicode list implemented.

Windows Phone has  a subset of all available Unicode characters in the OS keyboard, coming from different ranges in the Unicode characters charts. Like we have to do sometimes, we have to maintain our own list to make sure that all emojis are covered by our app in this case and update our code if needed.

If you want to learn more about unicode charts, they are officially available here: http://www.unicode.org/charts/

Update 2: I am using this methods in a real world app. Although the underlying Unicode can be used, often normal text will be read as emoji. That’s why I reverted back to my initial version with the emojis in it. I never had any problems with that.

Now let’s have a look at the code I am using. First is my detecting method, that returns a bool after checking the text (input):

             public static bool HasUnsoppertedCharacter(string text)
             {
            string pattern = @"[{allemojisshere}]";

            Regex RegexEmojisKeyboard = new Regex(pattern);

            bool booleanreturnvalue = false;

            if (RegexEmojisKeyboard.IsMatch(text))
            {
                booleanreturnvalue = true;
            }
            else if (!RegexEmojisKeyboard.IsMatch(text))
            {
                booleanreturnvalue = false;
            }
            return booleanreturnvalue;
            }

 

As you can see, I declared a character range with all emojis. If one or more emojis is found, the bool will always return true. This can be used to display a MessageBox for example while the user is typing.

The second method removes the emojis from any text that is passed as input string.

             public static string RemovedUnSoppertedCharacterString(string text)
             {
            string result = string.Empty;
            string cleanedResult = string.Empty;

            string pattern = @"[{allemojishere}]";

            MatchCollection matches = Regex.Matches(text, pattern);

            foreach (Match match in matches)
            {
                result = Regex.Replace(text, pattern, string.Empty);
                cleanedResult = Regex.Replace(result, "  ", " ");
            }
            return cleanedResult;
             }

Also here I am using the character range with all emojis . The method writes all occurrences of emojis into a MatchCollection for Regex. I iterate trough this collection to remove all of them. The Method also checks the string for double spaces in the text and makes it a single space, as this happens while removing the emojis .

User Experience hint:

use this method with care, as it could be seen as a data loss from your users. I am using the first method to display a MessageBox to the user that emojis are not supported and that they will be removed, which I am doing with the second method. This way, my users are informed and they don’t need to do anything to correct that.

You might have noticed that there is a placeholder “{allemojishere}” in the code above. WordPress or the code plugin I use aren’t supporting the Emoticons in code, that’s why I attached my helper class.

As always, I hope this will be helpful for some of you.

Happy coding!

Posted by msicc in Dev Stories, windev, 1 comment

The very weird way of checking if Bluetooth or Location is enabled

BT_GPS_WP_Blog

As I am in constant development of new features for my NFC Toolkit, I came to the point where I needed to detect if Bluetooth and Location is enabled or not.

I searched about an hour across the internet, searched all well known WPDev sites as well as the MSDN Windows Phone documentation.

The solution is a very weird one.

As I change the opacitiy of an Image depending on the stauts (on/off), I created the following async Task to check:

private async Task GetBluetoothState()
 {
 PeerFinder.AlternateIdentities["Bluetooth:Paired"] = "";

            try
 {
 var peers = await PeerFinder.FindAllPeersAsync();

                Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(() =>
 {
 BluetoothTileImage.Opacity = 1;
 });
 }
 catch (Exception ex)
 {
 if ((uint)ex.HResult == 0x8007048F)
 {
 Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(() =>
 {
 BluetoothTileImage.Opacity = 0.5;
 });
 }
 }
 }

As you can see above, we are searching for already paired devices with the Proximity API of Windows Phone. If we don’t have any of our already paired devices reachable, and we don’t throw an exception with the HResult of “0x8007048F”, Bluetooth is on. If the exception is raised, Bluetooth is off.

In a very similar way we need to check if the location setting is on:

private async Task GetLocationServicesState()
 {
 Geolocator geolocator = new Geolocator();

try
 {
 Geoposition geoposition = await geolocator.GetGeopositionAsync(
 maximumAge: TimeSpan.FromMinutes(5),
 timeout: TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10)
 );

Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(() =>
 {
 LocationStatusTileImage.Opacity = 1;
 });

}
 catch (Exception ex)
 {
 if ((uint)ex.HResult == 0x80004004)
 {
 Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(() =>
 {
 LocationStatusTileImage.Opacity = 0.5;
 });
 }
 else
 {
 //tbd.
 }

}
}

For the location services, the HResult is “0x80004004”. We are trying to get the actual GeoLocation, and if the exception is thrown, location setting is off.

On Twitter, I got for the later one also another suggestion to detect if the location settings is enabled or not, by Kunal Chowdhury (=>follow him!):

geoLocator.LocationStatus == PositionStatus.Disabled;

This would work technically, but PositionStatus has 6 enumarations. Also, as stated here in the Nokia Developer Wiki, this can be a battery intese call (depends on the implementation). I leave it to you which one you want to use.

Back to the header of this post. Catching an exception to determine the Status of wireless connections just seems wrong to me. I know this is a working “solution” and we can use that. But it could have been better implemented (for example like the networking API).

I hope this post is helpful for some of you.

Until then, happy coding!

Posted by msicc in Dev Stories, windev, 0 comments