Azure

Book review: Learning Windows Azure Mobile Services for Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 (Geoff Webber-Cross)

During the last months, I used the few times of my spare time when I wasn’t in the mood for programming to read Geoff’s latest book for diving deeper into Azure Mobile Services. Geoff is well known in the community for his Azure experience, and I absolutely recommend to follow him! I am really glad he asked me to review his book and need to apologize that it took so long to get this review up.

The book itself is very well structured with a true working XAML based game that utilizes both Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 and connects them to one single Mobile Service.

Even if you are completely new to Azure, you will quickly get things done as the whole book is full of step-by-step instructions. Let’s have a quick look on what you will learn while reading this book:

  1. Prepare your Azure account and set up your first Mobile Service
  2. Bring your Mobile Service to life and connect Visual Studio
  3. Securing user’s data
  4. Create your own API endpoints
  5. use Git via the console for remote development
  6. manage Push Notifications for both Windows and Windows Phone apps
  7. use the advantages of the Notification hub
  8. Best practices for app development – some very useful general guilty tips!

I already use a Mobile Service with my Windows Phone App TweeCoMinder. I have already started a Windows 8 version of that app, which basically only needs to be connected to my existing Azure Mobile Service to finish it.

Screenshot (359)

While reading Geoff’s book, I learned how I effectively can achieve this and also improve my code for handling the push notifications on both systems. The book is an absolutely worthy investment if you look into Azure and Mobile Services and has a lot of sample code that can be reused in your own application.

As this is my first book review ever, feel free to leave your feedback in the comments.

You can buy the book right here.

Happy coding, everyone!

Posted by msicc in Azure, Dev Stories, windev, 0 comments

Getting productive with WAMS: How to call Twitter REST API 1.1 from a scheduled script

WAMS.png

Like I promised in my first post about Windows Azure Mobile Services, I will show you how to call the Twitter Rest API 1.1 from a scheduled script. The documentation of the http request object does only use Twitter API 1.0 (which is no longer available).

First, you will need a Consumer key and a Consumer secret for your app. Just go to dev.twitter.com, register with your Twitter account and then add a new application.

The second thing you will need, is the so called Access token and Access token secret. Both are user dependent, without them Twitter will give you an error that your app is not authorized to use this account for anything on Twitter.

There are several ways to obtain these values. As I am registering the user within my phone app, I am uploading these values from phone and store it in my Mobile Services database.

To generate the requested data, we need several additional data for our request to Twitter:

  • a timestamp for the oAuth Header and the signature string
  • a random number to secure the request (= nonce)
  • an oAuth signature (signed array of the user’s data)
  • a HMAC encoded Hash string

These data is used for our request to Twitter.

Let’s start with the “simple” things:

generate Timestamp:

//generating the timestamp for the OAuth Header and signature string
var timestamp  = new Date() / 1000;
timestamp = Math.round(timestamp);

generate nonce

function generateNonce() {
    var code = "";
    for (var i = 0; i < 20; i++) {
        code += Math.floor(Math.random() * 9).toString();
    }
    return code;
}

oAuth signature

//generating the oAuth signatured array for the Twitter request
function generateOAuthSignature(method, url, data) {
    //remove query string parameters
    var index = url.indexOf('?');
    if (index > 0)
        url = url.substring(0, url.indexOf('?'));

    var signingToken = encodeURIComponent(ConsumerSecret) + "&" + encodeURIComponent(twitterAccessTokenSecret);

    var keys = [];
    for (var d in data) {
        if (d != 'oauth_signature') {
            //console.log('data:', d);
            keys.push(d);
        }
    }

    keys.sort();
    var output = "GET&" + encodeURIComponent(url) + "&";
    var params = "";
    keys.forEach(function (k) {
        params += "&" + encodeURIComponent(k) + "=" + encodeURIComponent(data[k]);
    });
    params = encodeURIComponent(params.substring(1));

    return hashString(signingToken, output + params, "base64");
}

generate the HMAC encoded hash string

//generate Hash-string, encoded in HMAC-SHA1 as required by Twitter's API v1.1
function hashString(key, str, encoding) {
    //console.log('basestring:', str);
    var hmac = crypto.createHmac("sha1", key);
    hmac.update(str);
    return hmac.digest(encoding);
}

Now we have prepared all of these functions, we are well prepared to call the Twitter API. In this example we are calling the user’s profile data:

function requestToTwitter()
{

    //the url declaration has to be in this function to make the request working!
    //declaring it in another function would cause an error 401 from Twitter's API
    url = 'https://api.twitter.com/1.1/users/show.json?user_id=' + twitterId;

    //generate data for sending the request to Twitter
    //this is the data used in the signature string as well as in the Authorization header
    var oAuthData = {oauth_consumer_key: ConsumerKey, oauth_nonce: nonce, oauth_signature: null, oauth_signature_method: "HMAC-SHA1", oauth_timestamp: timestamp, oauth_token: twitterAccessToken, oauth_version: "1.0"};
    var sigData = {};
    for (var k in oAuthData) {
        sigData[k] = oAuthData[k];
    }
    sigData['user_id'] = twitterId;

    var sig = generateOAuthSignature('GET', url, sigData);
    oAuthData.oauth_signature = sig;

    var oAuthHeader = "";
    for (k in oAuthData) {
        oAuthHeader += "," + encodeURIComponent(k) + "=\"" + encodeURIComponent(oAuthData[k]) + "\"";
    }
    oAuthHeader = oAuthHeader.substring(1);
    //very important to not miss the space after OAuth!
    authHeader = 'OAuth '+oAuthHeader;

    var reqOptions = {
            uri: url,
            headers: { 'Accept': 'application/json', 'Authorization': authHeader }
    };

    var httpRequest = require('request');
        httpRequest(reqOptions,callback );

}

var callback = function(err, response, body) {
    //console.log("in requestToTwitter = callback"); 
            if (err) {
            console.log(err)
            } else if (response.statusCode !== 200) {
                console.log("from twitter callback " + response.statusCode + " response: " + response.body);
            } else {
                var userProfile = JSON.parse(body);
                UserIdFromTwitter = userProfile.id;
                twitterScreenName = userProfile.screen_name;

}
}

You may have noticed that there are several variables that are not declared within these functions. Just declare them globally in your scheduled script.

You can read more about the oAuth authorization process at http://oauth.net/.

There are more services out there that use the oAuth process, so you should be able to convert this for other requests, like getPocket.com (formerly Read It later) and others.

As always, I hope this post was helpful for some of you.

Happy coding!

Posted by msicc in Azure, Dev Stories, 0 comments