Editorials

Introducing Coinpaprika and announcing C# API Client

Introducing Coinpaprika and announcing C# API Client

As I am diving deeper and deeper into the world of cryptocurrencies, I am exploring quite some interesting products. One of them is Coinpaprika, a market research site with some extensive information on every coin they have listed.

What is Coinpaprika?

In the world of cryptocurrencies, there are several things one needs to discover before investing. Starting with information on the project and its digital currencies, the persons behind a project as well as their current value and its price, there is a lot of data to walk through before investing. Several sites out there are providing aggregated information, and even provide APIs for us developers. However, most of them are

  •  extremely rate limited
  •  freemium with a complex pricing model
  •  slow

Why Coinpaprika?

A lot of services that provide aggregated data rely on data of the big players like CoinMarketCap. Coinpaprika, however, has a different strategy. They are pulling their data from a whopping number of 176 exchanges into their own databases, without any proxy. They have their own valuation system and a very fast refreshing rate (16 000 price updates per minute). If you have some time and want to compare how prices match up with their competition, Coinpaprika even implemented a metrics page for you. In my personal experience, their data is more reliable average to those values I see on those exchanges I deal with (Binance, Coinbase, BitPanda, Changelly, Shapeshift).

Coinpaprika API and Clients

Early last week, I discovered Coinpaprika on Steemit. They announced their API is now available to the general public along with clients for PHP, GO, Swift and NodeJS. Coinpaprika has also a WordPress plugin and an embeddable widget (on a coin’s detail page) that allows you to easily show price information on your website. After discovering their site, I got in contact with them to discuss a possible C# implementation for several reasons:

  •  very generous rate limits (25 920 00 requests per month, others are around 6 000 to 10 000), which enables very different implementation scenarios
  •  their API is fast like hell
  •  their independence from third parties besides exchanges
  •  their very catchy name (just being honest)

A few days later, I was able to discuss the publication of the C# API client implementation I wrote with them. I am happy to announce that you can now download the C# API Client from Nuget or fork it from my Github repository. They will also link to it from their official API repository soon. The readme-file on Github serves as documentation as well and shows how to easily integrate their data into your .NET apps. The library itself is written in .NET Standard 2.0. If there is the need to target lower versions, feel free to open a pull request on Github. The Github repo contains also a console tester application.

Conclusion

If you need reliable market data and information on the different projects behind all those cryptocurrencies, you should evaluate Coinpaprika. They aggregate their data without any third party involved and provide an easy to use and blazing fast API. I hope my contribution in form of the C# API client will be helpful for some of you out there.

If you like their product as much as I do, follow them:

  • Twitter: https://twitter.com/coinpaprika
  • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coinpaprika/
  • Steemit: https://steemit.com/@coinpaprika
  • Medium: https://medium.com/coinpaprika
  • Telegram: https://t.me/Coinpaprika

Happy coding, everyone!

Posted by msicc in Crypto&Blockchain, Dev Stories, Editorials, 1 comment
How Steemit changed the way I use traditional social networks

How Steemit changed the way I use traditional social networks

What the h*** is Steemit?

Steemit is a social network that (might) pay you for using it. You can earn rewards for posting quality posts, for commenting on others posts and also for curation (voting on other people’s posts).

There is a learning process (which I am still in, even if I advanced already a little), but you can also use some bots to get some attention and make money. Better and also more sustainable than (only) using those bots, however, is to participate in the community itself by commenting and voting as well as taking part in one of several challenges on Steemit. Take a look at the extensive FAQ on Steemit to learn more.

I was following Steemit ever since I stumbled upon it, and after two days of exploring, I created my account (which took around one week back then). There were several reasons for doing that, the most important ones are

  • the community activity I saw and liked
  • my general interest in real life, average joe usable blockchain projects
  • being tired of Facebook, Twitter and the likes
  • earning some bucks (of course)

First steps on Steemit

As soon as my account was created, I started to explore Steemit more deeply. A major part of this exploration included apps I can use on my PC and my phone. After some research, I found my combo of apps/frontends for Steemit:

Being on Steemit also includes promoting it on my other existing social network accounts. And of course, I do share my posts on Facebook and Twitter, using the proper hashtags to make people (hopefully) curious.

Changes…

Yesterday, I took the time to review my last month activity on those popular and established networks. My former daily social media routine included Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram to explore new stuff and things that interest me, besides following certain RSS-Feeds (using Inoreader).

Over time, one follows a lot of accounts because of a few posts they made, but once they are no longer interesting, we do not remove them. So there is a whole lot of bullsh*t in our timelines, and it takes a lot of time to get rid of them. Also, the networks themselves do promote posts we might be interested in, which (at least for me) often miss their targets. The result is, that I avoid using these networks in my daily routine and even stop interacting with them. They are “stealing” my time, literally, if I use them.

Steemit has a few interfaces and apps that make it a bit easier for me to see the stuff I am interested in. Not so much on my developer interests, but on all other interest I have (sadly, there is very little activity of the .NET community on Steemit). So in my daily routine, Steemit took already over Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. I do check the later ones only occasionally or when I get a notification that someone interacted with one of my accounts. This is the first time this happens within just a month.

I am posting a lot of stuff I would normally post directly to the established ones on Steemit, just to share a link to my Steemit account on those after that. I could also stop that, but I do hope that I can help to promote Steemit to the outer world by doing so.

Conclusion

Steemit is a blockchain based social network rewarding its users. The beginning of my Steemit journey was comparable with the one I had when I joined Twitter or Facebook years ago. You need to find out how everything works, build some connections, interact with others. The Steemit community (at least the parts I am interacting with) still has its spirit, which I am missing on the established networks for a long time. I will continue to focus my social activity on Steemit and to improve my interactions. I hope some of you will join and follow along.

 

image credits:

Steemit Logo

Background

 

Posted by msicc in Editorials, 0 comments
Saying Goodbye to 2017 [Editorial]

Saying Goodbye to 2017 [Editorial]

First Half

The first half of the year I wasn’t much into development besides work. I was asked to help building a new German Android news site, which turned out to be an impossible task because of several reasons (high author fluctuation was the baddest thing). In the end, the owners decided to go another route by turning the side into a a site dedicated to Chinese hardware, which is an area I do not have a lot of trust and interest. So I decided to step out of the project and focus again on my software development efforts.

Back to software development (Second Half)

The first thing I was focusing on in that area was to get deeper into web development with ASP.NET Core. I learned a few basics from Pluralsight and started to work on a project that I will (hopefully) bring forward in 2018.

I also got back deeper into cross platform development with Xamarin, especially Xamarin.Forms. As Microsoft killed all mobile efforts in the UWP, this step was one I denied way too long to go. As a logic step  I started with my ongoing series of blog posts about Xamarin Forms and the MVVMLight toolkit. If you missed it, here are the links to the posts:

During the first 8 month of the year, I was running Android as my daily driver. However, I never was really happy with the Android OS (and I am still not), so I decided to switch to the iPhone 8 Plus after its launch. I detailed the reasons why here:

Why I am (once again) using an iPhone [Editorial]

In the last month, I was also looking into some IOT development, and this is were my current focus is. In the next few weeks I have a private project that overlaps with a project at work. I really appreciate it when I can be productive in multiple ways, and those (sadly rare) overlapping projects are just plain awesome to work on.

Private things…

Having a look at my private goals (for those who care), I started with some functional fitness workouts in late summer. I am using the workout app from Skimble, which has some handy video guides and is way cheaper than a gym subscription. In 2018, I want to move on to get even more fit. On top, one of the biggest (and probably hardest) goal is to become a non-smoker. I am hoping that being more active has motivating impacts on the later goal as well. On top, in the last few days I had my first baby steps into meditation as well, but I am still struggling with that one. So, way to go in these parts of my life.

Well, this post is not as long as the ones of the years before, but I really already told you everything that happened this year. To close this post, I wish you all a happy end of the year, an awesome party tonight and I hope to welcome you all again in 2018 here on my personal blog.

Happy new year, everyone!

Posted by msicc in Dev Stories, Editorials, 0 comments
Why I am (once again) using an iPhone [Editorial]

Why I am (once again) using an iPhone [Editorial]

If you have been following along me for some time, you’ll probably know that I used to be a fan of Microsoft and its products (especially Windows Phone) for a long time, and I did really everything possible in the Microsoft ecosystem and promoted it whenever I was able to. Three years ago, no one – not even me –  could ever think of me using anything other than a phone with a Microsoft operating system on it.

Microsoft has changed…

The Microsoft a lot of us used to love is gone. It all started to become really bad for Windows Phone/10 Mobile when Steve Ballmer left the building (aka stepped down as CEO). He was the force behind all mobile efforts, and I think Windows Phone/Windows 10 Mobile would still exist with shiny new devices. However, Mr. Nadella is now the CEO of Microsoft. And as he stated recently in his book (“Hit Refresh”), he never understood why there should be another mobile OS besides iOS and Android (we all know duopoly is as bad as monopoly). All of his actions in the last few years, starting to burn out Nokia from Microsoft and also killing Windows 10 Mobile (even if he never would state that publicly), make sense after knowing this. Nadella’s Microsoft is a business oriented, cloud focused money machine with no more consumer love. Sure, they still have products for the consumer like Groove Music, but they do lack their consumer focus which we all enjoyed when Windows Phone started.

To sum it up, times have changed. The first steps outside the Microsoft ecosystem happened quite some time ago, you can read more on that topic right here:

Editorial: Why the app gap on Windows Phone/10 Mobile is a bigger problem than I thought

After that, I used and reviewed some Android devices for a German news site, and got back into the Android ecosystem by putting some apps (at least as beta) into the Play Store. After more than one year on Android, I see that fragmentation is still the biggest problem out there. It makes developing apps for it a mess, as there are tons of devices that do not behave like you expect when developing with a Nexus or any other plain Google device.

Software updates

Another point which is quite important, is the actuality of software updates. Due to the fragmentation problem and the ability for OEMs to change the whole user experience on Android, this has always been a problem. Google tries to address this problem with the latest Android Version Oreo, but this will not help with all those existing devices on the market that are running Marshmallow or Nougat. Even this year’s flagships are not able to catch up and profit from the new way to handle software updates. I do see a chance that this will change over the next year(s). However, this makes me to not want to spent any money on a recent Android device.

Google’s Pixel (and at least their Nexus 5X/6P) devices are certainly well built, and have a guarantee for getting the latest software updates first. However, they do not want to make me spend my money on them (not even the rumored second incarnation).  Then there is Samsung, which makes premium devices, but my experience with their smartphone has always ended bad – not only for myself, but also along my family and friends.

iOS however is kind of similar to Windows (Phone). iOS devices always get the most recent software, including bug fixes and security updates, because of the closed ecosystem. Their hardware is always from top quality. Even if they are no longer innovating like they did years ago, all features they have are very well implemented. Also, Apple supports their older devices over a long distance, which makes an iPhone a worthier device to invest money in than any Android device – especially in those devices that try to play in the same league like Apple does in terms of prices.

What’s missing?

That’s the point where I was already heavily surprised when I switched to Android. The fact that all those official apps are available on Android and iOS, does indeed make a huge difference. Some apps do have Widgets (on both Android and iOS). Sure, they are no live tiles, but those that I am using do their job in a similar good way, even if I have to swipe to left or right to get them.  On top of that, all Microsoft apps are also available on these two platforms, and most of them do actually work a lot better there than they do on their own OS. So more than a year away from Windows 10 Mobile, I do miss… nothing.

In the end…

… this was a personal decision. I was evangelizing Windows Phone and all other Microsoft products for years, as some of you may know. As they do no longer offer a valid mobile device and are not even able to get close to what Android and iOS have to offer in their ecosystems, I cannot continue to do this. I was on Android for quite some time, but in the end, I decided to go back to the iPhone, which I left a few years ago – you already read the reasons if you reached this point.

Maybe some of you felt the same way I did when moving away from Windows Phone/Windows 10 Mobile? Feel free to start a discussion here in the comments or on social media.

Until the next time, have fun!

Posted by msicc in Editorials, 0 comments

Editorial: Why the app gap on Windows Phone/10 Mobile is a bigger problem than I thought

Note: as this is an editorial, this blog post reflects my own experience and thoughts. You will agree with some points, but disagree with others. Feel free to leave a comment to start a discussion below.

Recently, I received a Nexus 5x as development device for a project I am about to start. As tech enthusiast, I could not resist to start using it as my daily driver.

As you might guess, I started with an install orgy of all the apps I am using on my Lumia 950 XL and set them up. It may be surprising, but I immediately recognized huge differences between the platform versions.

Take the Facebook app for example. Animations are smooth like butter, almost all settings are in app instead of leading to a mobile page, even loading content and scrolling is a whole lot better than on Windows 10 Mobile.

Another example is the Path app. Never been updated since its launch on Windows Phone, I was truly surprised when I opened It on Android. It is an app that really is fun to use on Android. I bet they would have a lot more users on Windows if they align the app… sadly, they abanonded the platform completely a few month ago.

The last example is the WordPress app. It exists on Windows (Phone) for existing users, but the experience on Android is galaxies away from the one the one in Windows (Phone) has/had. I am even writting this post with it, because it feels just right to do this (I only did that once on Windows Phone).

These were only three examples, but they show pretty much how different official apps can be between platforms (and how they are supported). And they all show, that Windows really has no priority anywhere (sadly).
The quality of apps that are available on Windows is not all, though. Of course, I downloaded also some apps that aren’t available for my Lumia 950 XL as well. And it does make a difference.

On my Lumia, I often use the mobile page for things to do/achieve. On Android, I have a whole lot more apps to choose from, so I never had to open the browser for:

  • my mobile carrier
  • my landline & tv carrier
  • the communal page of Winterthur (where I live)
  • swiss auction page of ricardo.ch
  • swiss page tutti.ch
  • Amazon (Bonus: the apps are connected, needed to log in only on one and all others had my account)
  • eat.ch, a swiss food order service
  • Imgur
  • Giphy
  • and more…

Some say a good mobile page is as good as an app. That’s wrong for most cases. A good written app is always handier than a website. On any platform (at least in my experience).

Android app quality has improved a lot in the last two and a half years (that’s how long it took me to deeply test the OS and the ecosystem again). They are equal to the high level on iOS (which I saw also recently, as my son broke out of the Windows world I created at home).

On Windows, we have a lot of third party apps that are trying to fill the gap. I respect those developers (at least those that use legal, public APIs), but it is just not the same. And even on Android (or iOS), there is room for third party apps besides the official ones.

The Android OS itself feels also grown up, and it is difficult to say if iOS or Android are better. It is more a question of who you prefer – Google or Apple.

Microsoft’s Windows (Phone/10 Mobile) is on a good way to get on par. Lots of the functionality is also there. But… as long as the provider of a service, no matter which kind, do not use them (for whatever reason), Windows will never grow up. The Universal App approach is a good idea, and it may pay off one day – or it may be too late already. The recent switch to focus on enterprise users does not really help. Because also enterprise users tend to have only one device. And also enterprise users tend to use apps on their mobile device.

As a WinPhan, writting this honest post deeply hurts. Even more, as I really am thinking about switching platforms for mobile things. Not as a developer, but as a user (at least until Windows has grown up).

Posted by msicc in Editorials, 4 comments

Playing around with Microsoft Hololens

Yesterday in the morning, Alessandro  invited me to join a meetup targeting the Hololens. As the Hololens is very rare outside the US, I just needed to join the event.

When I arrived, already one of the meetup attendees was introduced to the Hololens. After some time, it was then my turn. The first “challenge” one has to take is to adjust the device on your head. The Hololens has quite some weight – it is a full PC you are wearing on your head, so not much a surprise.

After I mounted the Hololens on my head, I needed to start the calibration app. You have to adjust four corners you are seeing on the display. This is quite a challenge, but once you have it done, you’re ready to go.

GianPaolo recommended me to play level one of the space shooter game “Project X-Ray”, to get a better feeling for the device. You may probably know this from various Microsoft demos already (if not, click here). The game first scans the environment, and then you have to shot down all the alien robots that are coming out of the wall. As much fun as it is, it is challenging (at least at my age). Here is a shot of what I (and others) saw:

hololens2

After that, I tried the Galaxy Explorer app. It is amazing, you can zoom in and out of the point of interests in the 3D galaxy map, pretty much like we know already from some science-fiction movies. Here’s a shot of me in action:

hololens1

One thing needs to be clear. The Hololens does no longer interact with any object like we all are used to. It takes user interaction to a whole new level. You’ll have to learn some gestures, like the “bloom”-gesture to open the start menu. But that’s only how you control the device. We all will be able to add our own ways of interaction in our apps (that we will write one day, I bet!). I have already some ideas what I could do (well, also thanks to my kids and wife, tbh). One of them is a holographic version of my first app I ever wrote (which is a fishing knots tutorial app with animated step-by-step guide).

What about you? Do you have ideas for Hololens apps/games? Sound off in the comments, if you want to share your ideas. You can also find more info on Hololens development here on MSDN.

To close this post, I want to thank the team of IBV Solutions for this absolutely awesome opportunity. Thank you, guys!

Posted by msicc in Editorials, 0 comments

Review of 2015–my first year in Switzerland

2015 was once again a year where a lot happened. My year began with the start of a new job – I am now employed as a full time developer at the Swiss Shareholder register ShareCommService AG. The first days in Switzerland where full of trouble, as I needed to start from scratch in a new country. I found a room in a shared appartment, which was quite ok for me alone. Internet, phone, insurance, pass port – these were the things I had to do in the first weeks besides learning all the new things that you usually do when entering a new company.

timerarmvvmAs part of my new job, it was also heavily demanded that I finally get deeply into MVVM. I always read a lot about that, but avoided it because I wanted to get things done in my private projects. My MVVM learning project was a WPF timer app that supports resuming, multiple timers and more. I learned it in the only right way: without any frameworks/toolkits, which helps a lot to understand what is going on. Needless to say that I am happy to be past this point, as we are using MVVM Light a lot in our LOB applications. LOB (Line-of-Business) applications are different from what I have done before. They are used only internally and directly affect our daily business. I also learned more about SQL and databases, and also SignalR took a big part of my learning curve.

I have the luck to learn from Roman Müller, who has a gigantic amount of experience in programming and also has always some funny programming story to tell from his past. Together with Reto, the second programmer in our team, he teached me a lot – not only programming things, but also better ways to analyze and think about situations where you can end in programming. I am really thankful to be part of this team. Our system administrator Stefan, which I like to refer as a ‘BOFH with the heart on the right place’, makes the team complete.

During the year, I participated also in several Annual General Meetings (AGM) of our customers. This was very helpful for me to understand my new job, as we are responsible for all things regarding the votings on their agenda.

My first private project this year was to rewrite Voices Admin as a universal (Windows 8.1) app. Of course I did it as plain MVVM app, and it helped me a lot to get even deeper into it, and also boosted my learning curve in my daily job. I updated my UserVoice library as well to be fully portable in the meantime. Currently, I am working on the UWP version of UniShare.

voices admin

My family stayed in Germany for several private reasons in the first month of the year. Beginning in August, we moved completely to Switzerland. I am happy that we passed this point as my family is very important to me and is giving me a lot of power. I have to thank my wife and also both of my kids for their understanding, as being a programmer is often very time consuming.

I also discovered a completely new area: the Internet of Things. With the Rasperry Pi2 supporting the Windows 10 IoT Core, I played around with it, learned a few new things about building hardware – and build a prototype for internal testings.

raspi2proto

You see, I had a year full of action, and I tried to make this post as short as possible. I am looking forward to 2016, where my developer story will continue. I did also blog only a few things this year, and I am trying to keep things up and post more frequently next year.

For now, I whish everyone all the best for the end of this year and also for 2016!

Posted by msicc in Editorials, 0 comments

Review of a geek’s 2014

We are close to the end of this year 2014, time for a little review.

At the beginning of the year, I was mostly busy with working on my UserVoice library that makes it easier for me and other developers to integrate UserVoice into Windows Phone apps. I also launched Voices Admin, the companion app for the library. I will start to rewrite this library in 2015 to make it a true Universal library for Windows, Windows Phone as well as Xamarin (and make it return objects instead of naked JSON strings).

I also had some troubles with my former hoster, which lead to a total domain chaos and finally ended in January, too. Thanks to Azure Websites, the transition should have been without problems.  At Telefónica, I was busy finishing the internal App “Friends & You” for Android and Windows Phone. I learned a lot using Xamarin for the Android version, and even more about corporate rules and requirements. In the beginning of December, I also finished the iOS variant of the app (using Xamarin.Forms) – which is sadly set to be not launched for the moment (mostly because of my departing of Telefónica).

During the year, we also received the Windows Phone 8.1 Developer Preview. It removed the ability to cross post on social networks on Windows Phone. As this was one of my most used features, I decided to solve this problem for myself and started to write my own cross posting solution. As some of my followers recognized this, I continued my efforts to a more public and polished version, the result is UniShare for Windows Phone.

ae4dc8ca-2d86-4e36-bf9b-d7c2985a68b1

Since the first WP8.1 Developer Preview, we also have Cortana. Cortana is an awesome piece of software – if you are willing to use your phone with English and US region settings. I tried the UK version as well as the Italian and German version, but was only satisfied with the US one. I truly hope that the other countries will be on par in 2015.

I also updated my very first app ever (Fishing Knots +) to a Windows Phone 8 only version, leaving the old version for WP7 users. Also my NFC Toolkit received some love (and will receive even more in 2015). On top, I started to work on a Universal library for WordPress, which I will also continue to work on in 2015 to make it even better.

One of my saddest geek moments was when the screen of my Intel developer Ultrabook broke shorty before Christmas. As I need to be able working while on the go, I needed a replacement. I found it in the ASUS TP300L Transformer Flipbook, which is an awesome piece of an Ultrabook. On top, Santa (aka my wife) gifted me an HP Stream 7 tablet, that perfectly fits my needs for a tablet use (reading, surfing, playing some games). And so this part also turned well.

The most significant thing happened in September, when I read about a job as a C# Junior developer in Switzerland. I am truly happy about the fact I got this job (read more on it here), and already learned some new things in WPF. Currently, I am also working on my first WPF application, that is a practicing project for my new job I am going to start next year. Which leads me to the end of this short review.

2014 was a year with ups and downs like every year. I had some trouble in “first world” that we were able to solve as family (and friends), but made some good success in my geek and dev world. I am looking forward to 2015, where I am starting a new chapter in my dev story (with becoming a full time developer). But there are also some nice side projects, like maybe porting some apps to Android as well as the Internet of Things, which I am looking forward to dive in deeper. And of course, like any other MS fan, I am looking forward to the next evolutions of Windows 10!

What are you all looking for? How was your 2014? Feel free to comment below.

158340786

Happy New Year, everyone!

Posted by msicc in Editorials, 1 comment

Goodbye Telefónica (Germany), Hello ShareCommService (Switzerland)

Yes, you read that right. Today was my last work day at Telefónica, where I worked since June 2007. During that time, I learned a lot about how good customer service should be, and even more about mobile networks and mobile devices (phones, tablets and more). During that time, I also started my dev story in my spare time – all because there was not a single fishing knots application available for Windows Phone (read more here).

This lead to get recognized also within Telefónica as a developer, and so I was asked to concept and develop the application Friends & You (nope, you can’t download it as it is an internal app).  I learned a lot about how corporate apps aren’t that easy to concept and build during that time, as well as as how restrictive corporate rules can be. After all, I had a few challenges to complete. Thanks to Friends & You, I was also able to dive into the world of Xamarin, where I learned a lot about the application structures of Android and iOS (which will be helpful for eventually porting some of my Windows Phone apps to those two).

I want to say thanks to my colleagues, you´re awesome! Keep up the great work you´re doing in Customer Service.

Back in September then, I opened up my Twitter app and the first tweet I read was this one:

image

I opened the attached document and read the job description. As an self-thought developer, I first was about to close it and put it aside as “read and done”.

Due to the head count freeze at Telefónica after acquiring e-Plus from KPN, there are no chances to become a real full time developer within Telefónica for the next time. But that is what I want to do. After reopening the document and reading it again, I decided to get in contact with Roman Mueller (who I knew from Twitter already).

We talked about the job itself and the circumstances behind the announcement. After a few talks and a visit in Switzerland, the decision was made. I am starting the next chapter of my developer story in January, moving to Switzerland, where I will add deeper SQL knowledge, WPF and a lot more to my development knowledge.

At this point, I want to thank ShareCommService and especially Roman for all the help I received already to make this all happen and get started.

It is going to be an exciting journey for me (and my family), and we are ready to go.

Happy coding everyone!

Posted by msicc in Dev Stories, Editorials, 1 comment

Editorial: We are all humans (why racism sucks)

We_Are_The_World

Last night, the news were full of the decision of the grand jury in Ferguson (USA) (because of a young black man that got killed by a white police officer) and the following riots.  A lot of discussions took place, be it at work or also on social media. The common bottom line: racism just sucks. I normally avoid such harsh words or decorate them with an asterisk, but today I need to write it out.

What is racism?

There are two common definitions for racism:

  • the prejudice that members of one race are intrinsically superior to members of other races
  • discriminatory or abusive behavior towards members of another race

What I learned is that both are closely tied together. If one thinks that his race is superior, it leads to bad behavior against those from the other race.

My Family and me are experiencing this quite often. Being an Italian family living in Germany, we often got discriminated because of this. I do not want to got to deep into details, because drilling into old (and not so old) wounds isn’t helpful for the message of this post. The only comment I am leaving: it can be quite challenging to overcome this.

During our history, a lot of racism took place. Be it the Roman empire or the Spanish conquistadors, the early Americans or the Germans (this could be an endless list): they all have behave racist. This needs to come to an end. No race on this planet is truly superior in all aspects to all others. All races have their own aspect where they are superior to others. But instead of discriminating the other race and search for the point where your race is better than mine, we should look into where we can learn from each other.

We are all strangers here, no matter where we are born or live.

I like how my wife thinks about this:

We are all strangers here, no matter where we are born or live. We don’t own this planet. We are only guests that are tolerated on this planet. Instead of being violent to each other because of different races, we should more collaborate to continue being tolerated at this planet.

She is right. It does not make any sense that we fight against each other because of the color of our skin, our language, our nationality or religion. It does not make any sense to be abusive against each other because a few people scream out loud that they think they are better because of their race. In fact, they are screaming out that they think to be better than everyone, even those of their own race. There will always be people that follow blindly just because they want to live as convenient as possible. But it is up to everyone of us to change that.

I can’t help, but at this point of writing I feel in the mood for “We are the world”. One of the lines is “We can’t go on pretending day by day that someone somewhere will soon make a change.”

Everyone is responsible for his/her behavior.  Everyone is responsible to NOT be a racist.

Everyone is responsible to be a human.

 

 

Image credit: University of California

 

Posted by msicc in Editorials, 0 comments