renderer

#XfQaD: Limit maximum lines of Label and indicate text truncation

#XfQaD: Limit maximum lines of Label and indicate text truncation

The problem

Xamarin.Forms.Labelhas a common set of properties we can use to configure how our text is shown. However, it does miss a property to limit the maximum of text lines and a proper indication of eventually truncated text. Knowing that UWP, Android and iOS have working and easy-to-use implementations on their platform controls used for the Xamarin.Forms.Label, there is only one solution to the problem: exposing a custom control and its platform renderers. That’s what we are going to do in this #XfQaD.

XfMaxLines Label implementation

Let’s have a look at the Xamarin.Forms implementation first. I am just adding a BindablePropertyto a derived class implementation to define the maximum of lines I want to see:

public class XfMaxLinesLabel : Label
{
    public XfMaxLinesLabel(){ }

    public static BindableProperty MaxLinesProperty = BindableProperty.Create("MaxLines", typeof(int), typeof(XfMaxLinesLabel), int.MaxValue, BindingMode.Default);

    public int MaxLines
    {
        get => (int)GetValue(MaxLinesProperty);
        set => SetValue(MaxLinesProperty, value);
    }
}

UWP

The UWP renderer uses the TextBlock properties MaxLinesto limit the amount of shown lines, while the TextTrimmingproperty is set to ellipsize the last word before reaching the limit. The implementation is pretty straight forward:

[assembly: ExportRenderer(typeof(XfMaxLinesLabel), typeof(XfMaxLinesLabelRenderer))]
namespace MaxLinesLabel.UWP
{
    public class XfMaxLinesLabelRenderer : LabelRenderer
    {
        protected override void OnElementChanged(ElementChangedEventArgs<Label> e)
        {
            base.OnElementChanged(e);

            if (((XfMaxLinesLabel)e.NewElement).MaxLines == -1 || ((XfMaxLinesLabel)e.NewElement).MaxLines == int.MaxValue)
                return;

            this.Control.MaxLines = ((XfMaxLinesLabel)e.NewElement).MaxLines;
            this.Control.TextTrimming = Windows.UI.Xaml.TextTrimming.WordEllipsis;
        }

        protected override void OnElementPropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            base.OnElementPropertyChanged(sender, e);

            if (e.PropertyName == XfMaxLinesLabel.MaxLinesProperty.PropertyName)
            {
                if (((XfMaxLinesLabel)this.Element).MaxLines == -1 || ((XfMaxLinesLabel)this.Element).MaxLines == int.MaxValue)
                    return;

                this.Control.MaxLines = ((XfMaxLinesLabel)this.Element).MaxLines;
                this.Control.TextTrimming = Windows.UI.Xaml.TextTrimming.WordEllipsis;
            }
        }
    }
}

Android

The Android implementation uses the MaxLinesproperty of Android’s TextView control to limit the maximum visible lines. The Ellipsizeproperty is used to show the three dots for truncation at the end of the last visible line. Once again, pretty straight forward.

[assembly: ExportRenderer(typeof(XfMaxLinesLabel), typeof(XfMaxLinesLabelRenderer))]
namespace MaxLinesLabel.Droid
{
    class XfMaxLinesLabelRenderer : LabelRenderer
    {
        public XfMaxLinesLabelRenderer(Context context) : base(context)
        {
        }


        protected override void OnElementChanged(ElementChangedEventArgs<Label> e)
        {
            base.OnElementChanged(e);

            if (((XfMaxLinesLabel)e.NewElement).MaxLines == -1 || ((XfMaxLinesLabel)e.NewElement).MaxLines == int.MaxValue)
                return;
            this.Control.SetMaxLines(((XfMaxLinesLabel)e.NewElement).MaxLines);
            this.Control.Ellipsize = TextUtils.TruncateAt.End;
        }


        protected override void OnElementPropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            base.OnElementPropertyChanged(sender, e);

            if (e.PropertyName == XfMaxLinesLabel.MaxLinesProperty.PropertyName)
            {
                if (((XfMaxLinesLabel)this.Element).MaxLines == -1 || ((XfMaxLinesLabel)this.Element).MaxLines == int.MaxValue)
                    return;
                this.Control.SetMaxLines(((XfMaxLinesLabel)this.Element).MaxLines);
                this.Control.Ellipsize = TextUtils.TruncateAt.End;
            }
        }
    }
}

iOS

Like Android and Windows, also the UILabel control on iOS has a MaxLinesproperty. You’re right, we’ll use this one to limit the count of visible lines. Using the LineBreakModeproperty, we can automate the text truncation indicator equally easy as on Android and UWP:

[assembly: ExportRenderer(typeof(XfMaxLinesLabel), typeof(XfMaxLinesLabelRenderer))]
namespace MaxLinesLabel.iOS
{
    public class XfMaxLinesLabelRenderer : LabelRenderer
    {
        protected override void OnElementChanged(ElementChangedEventArgs<Label> e)
        {
            base.OnElementChanged(e);

            if (((XfMaxLinesLabel)e.NewElement).MaxLines == -1 || ((XfMaxLinesLabel)e.NewElement).MaxLines == int.MaxValue)
                return;

            this.Control.Lines = ((XfMaxLinesLabel)e.NewElement).MaxLines;
            this.Control.LineBreakMode = UILineBreakMode.TailTruncation;
        }

        protected override void OnElementPropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            base.OnElementPropertyChanged(sender, e);

            if (e.PropertyName == XfMaxLinesLabel.MaxLinesProperty.PropertyName)
            {
                if (((XfMaxLinesLabel)this.Element).MaxLines == -1 || ((XfMaxLinesLabel)this.Element).MaxLines == int.MaxValue)
                    return;

                this.Control.Lines = ((XfMaxLinesLabel)this.Element).MaxLines;
                this.Control.LineBreakMode = UILineBreakMode.TailTruncation;
            }
        }
    }
}

Conclusion

As you can see, it is pretty easy to create a line limited, truncation indicating custom Label for your Xamarin.Forms app. The implementation is done in a few minutes, but it makes writing your cross platform app a bit easier. I don’t know why this is not (yet) implemented in current Xamarin.Forms iterations, but I do hope they’ll do so to further reduce the number of needed custom renderers.

In the meantime, feel free to check the sample code on GitHub and use it in your apps. As always, I hope this post is helpful for some of you.

Happy coding, everyone!

Posted by msicc in Android, Dev Stories, iOS, UWP, Xamarin, 1 comment
#XfQaD: Using ProgressRing for UWP and keep a single activity indicator API in Xamarin.Forms

#XfQaD: Using ProgressRing for UWP and keep a single activity indicator API in Xamarin.Forms

I recently recognized that I have written quite a few “Quick-and-Dirty”-solutions for Xamarin Forms that run well for most scenarios. There is a chance they will not work in all and every scenario, and therefore may need some more work at a later point. I am sharing them to bring the ideas to the community, and often these “QaDs” are enough one needs to solve one particular problem. As they do not fit well into my other series I am writing (“Xamarin Forms, the MVVMLight toolkit and I” for example), I gave them their own tag: #XfQaD.

The scenario

The first scenario may not be important to a lot of people, but I wanted to solve this rather small one quickly for me. The UWP implementation of Xamarin Forms’ ActivityIndicatoruses the ProgressBarinstead of a ring indicator like Android and iOS:

default activity indicator screenshots

image credits: Xamarin

While this will be fine in most cases, I had the problem of limited space, and I wanted a similar UI on all three platforms for that app. The UWP has a perfect matching native control, so I implemented my own ActivityIndicatorimplementation called LoadingRing. It uses the ProgressRingcontrol on UWP and keeps the default ActivityIndicatoron all other platforms. I also wanted to keep a single API I can use throughout my app without always thinking about the platform usings.

Implementation structure

The QaD-solution I came up with has a simple structure:

  • base class implementation providing the API for the custom renderer on UWP
  • the custom renderer in the UWP project
  • a catalyst class that unifies the different implementations

Let’s have a look into the code:

API for the custom renderer

The API for the custom render has the same properties as the Xamarin.Forms.ActivityIndicator has. They are BindableProperties, so they are perfectly prepared for MVVM. Here is all that we need in there:

public class ProgressRingIndicator : View
{
    public ProgressRingIndicator()
    {
        if (Device.RuntimePlatform != Device.UWP)
        {
            throw new NotSupportedException($"{nameof(ProgressRingIndicator)} is just for UWP, use {nameof(ActivityIndicator)} on {Device.RuntimePlatform}");
        }
    }

    public static readonly BindableProperty ColorProperty = BindableProperty.Create("Color", typeof(Color), typeof(ProgressRingIndicator), default(Color), BindingMode.Default);

    public Color Color
    {
        get => (Color)GetValue(ColorProperty);
        set => SetValue(ColorProperty, value);
    }

    public static readonly BindableProperty IsRunningProperty = BindableProperty.Create("IsRunning", typeof(bool), typeof(ProgressRingIndicator), default(bool), BindingMode.Default);

    public bool IsRunning
    {
        get => (bool)GetValue(IsRunningProperty);
        set => SetValue(IsRunningProperty, value);
    }
}

If you need more info on the implementation of BindableProperties, just have a look at the Xamarin.Forms documentation. Basically, they are what Windows developers know as DependencyProperty.

The renderer and two little extensions

One of the great things of Xamarin.Forms is the ability to use native controls via custom renderers. It makes implementing platform specific code easy while keeping the amount of shared code pretty high. As I know that also beginners read my posts, here is once again a link to the Xamarin documentation. Let’s have a look at the two little extension I mentioned first, as they make our renderer code more readable.

Xamarin.Forms and the UWP have different implementations of the Color structure (Xamarin | UWP). In order to connect them, we need to translate the Xamarin.Forms.Colorto a Windows.UI.Colorand pass the later one to a SolidColorBrushto give the ProgressRingthe color we want. The implementation is pretty straight forward:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static Color ToUwPColor(this Xamarin.Forms.Color color)
    {
        return Color.FromArgb(
            Convert.ToByte(color.A * 255),
            Convert.ToByte(color.R * 255),
            Convert.ToByte(color.G * 255),
            Convert.ToByte(color.B * 255));
    }

    public static SolidColorBrush ToUwpSolidColorBrush(this Xamarin.Forms.Color color)
    {
        return new SolidColorBrush(color.ToUwPColor());
    }
}

The Windows.UI.Color.FromArgbmethod is accepting only bytes as value, so we have to convert the Xamarin.Forms.Colorchannels to bytes and pass them along. With these extensions, we will have the color setting in the renderer in just one single line.

So let’s get finally to the renderer:

[assembly: ExportRenderer(typeof(ProgressRingIndicator), typeof(ProgressRingIndicatorRenderer))]
namespace [YourNameSpaceHere].UWP
{
    public class ProgressRingIndicatorRenderer : ViewRenderer<ProgressRingIndicator, ProgressRing>
    {
        private ProgressRing _progressRing;

        protected override void OnElementChanged(ElementChangedEventArgs<ProgressRingIndicator> e)
        {
            base.OnElementChanged(e);

            if (this.Control != null) return;

            _progressRing = new ProgressRing();

            if (e.NewElement != null)
            {
                _progressRing.IsActive = this.Element.IsRunning;
                _progressRing.Visibility = this.Element.IsRunning ? Visibility.Visible : Visibility.Collapsed;
                var xfColor = this.Element.Color;
                _progressRing.Foreground = xfColor.ToUwpSolidColorBrush();

                SetNativeControl(_progressRing);
            }
        }

        protected override void OnElementPropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            base.OnElementPropertyChanged(sender, e);

            if (e.PropertyName == nameof(ProgressRingIndicator.Color))
            {
                _progressRing.Foreground = this.Element.Color.ToUwpSolidColorBrush();
            }

            if (e.PropertyName == nameof(ProgressRingIndicator.IsRunning))
            {
                _progressRing.IsActive = this.Element.IsRunning;
                _progressRing.Visibility = this.Element.IsRunning ? Visibility.Visible : Visibility.Collapsed;
            }

            if (e.PropertyName == nameof(ProgressRingIndicator.WidthRequest))
            {
                _progressRing.Width = this.Element.WidthRequest > 0 ? this.Element.WidthRequest : 20;
                UpdateNativeControl();
            }

            if (e.PropertyName == nameof(ProgressRingIndicator.HeightRequest))
            {
                _progressRing.Height = this.Element.HeightRequest > 0 ? this.Element.HeightRequest : 20;
                UpdateNativeControl();
            }
        }
    }
}

ViewRender<TElement, TNativeElement>enables us to use native controls in Xamarin.Forms, so we’re deriving from it. Like any custom renderer, our renderer overrides the OnElementChangedmethod to set the initial rendering values. The Controlproperty is the native control implementation, while the Xamarin.Forms control comes in via ElementChangedEventArgs.NewElementproperty, but you can also use the Elementproperty in most cases.

In order to react to changes of the different properties of the control, we need to handle the OnElementPropertyChangedevent. This event can fire quite often, so it makes absolutely sense to filter code execution to run only when a specific property change happens.

Bring back my single API

With the code above, I am already able to use the ProgressRingIndicator. However, I have to use the On<T>platform implementation everywhere to do so. As I already mentioned before, I want to have a single API when I use the control. To solve this problem, I created a catalyst class:

public class LoadingRing : ContentView
{
    public readonly ProgressRingIndicator UwpProgressRing;
    public readonly ActivityIndicator ActivityIndicator;

    public LoadingRing()
    {
        switch (Device.RuntimePlatform)
        {
            case Device.UWP:
                this.UwpProgressRing = new ProgressRingIndicator();
                this.UwpProgressRing.HorizontalOptions = LayoutOptions.FillAndExpand;
                this.UwpProgressRing.VerticalOptions = LayoutOptions.FillAndExpand;
                this.Content = this.UwpProgressRing;
                break;
            default:
                this.ActivityIndicator = new ActivityIndicator();
                this.ActivityIndicator.HorizontalOptions = LayoutOptions.FillAndExpand;
                this.ActivityIndicator.VerticalOptions = LayoutOptions.FillAndExpand;
                this.Content = this.ActivityIndicator;
                break;
        }

        SizeChanged += LoadingRing_SizeChanged;

    }

    private void LoadingRing_SizeChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        switch (Device.RuntimePlatform)
        {
            case Device.UWP:
                this.UwpProgressRing.HeightRequest = this.HeightRequest;
                this.UwpProgressRing.WidthRequest = this.WidthRequest;
                break;
            default:
                this.ActivityIndicator.HeightRequest = this.HeightRequest;
                this.ActivityIndicator.WidthRequest = this.WidthRequest;
                break;
        }
    }

    public static readonly BindableProperty ColorProperty = BindableProperty.Create("Color", typeof(Color), typeof(LoadingRing), default(Color), BindingMode.Default, propertyChanged: OnColorPropertyChanged);

    private static void OnColorPropertyChanged(BindableObject bindable, object oldvalue, object newvalue)
    {
        if (bindable is LoadingRing current)
        {
            switch (Device.RuntimePlatform)
            {
                case Device.UWP:
                    if (current.UwpProgressRing != null) current.UwpProgressRing.Color = (Color)newvalue;
                    break;
                default:
                    if (current.ActivityIndicator != null) current.ActivityIndicator.Color = (Color)newvalue;
                    break;
            }
        }
    }

    public Color Color
    {
        get => (Color)GetValue(ColorProperty);
        set => SetValue(ColorProperty, value);
    }

    public static readonly BindableProperty IsRunningProperty = BindableProperty.Create("IsRunning", typeof(bool), typeof(LoadingRing), default(bool), BindingMode.Default, propertyChanged: OnIsRunningChanged);

    private static void OnIsRunningChanged(BindableObject bindable, object oldvalue, object newvalue)
    {
        if (bindable is LoadingRing current)
        {
            switch (Device.RuntimePlatform)
            {
                case Device.UWP:
                    if (current.UwpProgressRing != null) current.UwpProgressRing.IsRunning = (bool)newvalue;
                    break;
                default:
                    if (current.ActivityIndicator != null) current.ActivityIndicator.IsRunning = (bool)newvalue;
                    break;
            }
        }
    }

    public bool IsRunning
    {
        get => (bool)GetValue(IsRunningProperty);
        set => SetValue(IsRunningProperty, value);
    }

}

The implementation derives from ContentView. Depending on the platform my app is running, I am using my custom implementation of the ProgressRingIndicatorcontrol or the default Xamarin.Forms.ActivityIndicator to set the Contenton it. It is also important to handle the SizeChangedevent properly, otherwise the control will never be resized. As the custom implementation before, this catalyst exposes the same properties as the ActivityIndicator, so it is very easy to replace all existing places where I use the default control with it.

That’s it, we have a QaD-implementation that makes it easier to have a similar activity-indicating UI across platforms now. If you want to see it in action, there is a sample available on GitHub. As always, I hope this post is helpful for some of you.

Happy Coding, everyone!

Posted by msicc in Dev Stories, UWP, Xamarin, 2 comments
Xamarin Forms, the MVVMLight Toolkit and I: taking control over the back buttons

Xamarin Forms, the MVVMLight Toolkit and I: taking control over the back buttons

Why do I need to take control over the back button behavior?

The back button is available on Windows, Android and under certain conditions on iOS. It is one of the key navigation hooks. While the implementations vary between platforms, the functionality is always the same – go back one step in navigation. Sometimes, we need to execute actions before going back, like notifying other parts of our application or even blocking back navigation because we need to perform actions on the local page (think of a WebViewthat has internal navigation capabilities for example). While we do need only a few lines to intercept the hardware back button on Android and UWP, the software back buttons on Android and iOS need some additional code.

Xamarin.Forms – View and ViewModel implementations

Based on the code we have already written in the past posts of this series, we are already able to get events pretty easy into our ViewModel, utilizing the EventToCommandBehavior approach. To get them into our ViewModel, we will throw an own created event. You can do so pretty easy by overriding the OnBackButtonPressed()method every Xamarin.Forms pages come with:

protected override bool OnBackButtonPressed()
{
    base.OnBackButtonPressed();
    BackButtonPressed?.Invoke(this, EventArgs.Empty);
    
    //return true; //breaks navigation    
    return false; //executes navigation
}

Depending on the boolean you will return here, the back navigation will be executed or not. The next step is to pass the event into our ViewModel, like we have done already with the ViewAppearingand ViewDisappearing events before:

private void XfNavContentPage_BindingContextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (this.BindingContext is XfNavViewModelBase @base)
    {
        this.Behaviors.Add(new EventToCommandBehavior()
        {
            EventName = "Appearing",
            Command = @base.ViewAppearingCommand
        });

        this.Behaviors.Add(new EventToCommandBehavior()
        {
            EventName = "Disappearing",
            Command = @base.ViewDisappearingCommand
        });

        this.Behaviors.Add(new EventToCommandBehavior()
        {
            EventName = "BackButtonPressed",
            Command = @base.BackButtonPressedCommand
        });
    }
}

As you can see from the snippet above, the next step is to add the BackButtonPressedCommandto our base ViewModel. There is nothing special on that, so here we go:

private RelayCommand _backButtonPressedCommand; 

public RelayCommand BackButtonPressedCommand =>
    _backButtonPressedCommand ?? (_backButtonPressedCommand = new RelayCommand(ExecuteBackButtonPressedCommand, CanExecuteBackButtonPressedCommand));

public virtual void ExecuteBackButtonPressedCommand() { }

public virtual bool CanExecuteBackButtonPressedCommand() 
{
    return true;
}

And that’s it, if you just want to get informed or handle back navigation on your own. However, from some of the projects I have worked on, I know that I may need to prevent back navigation. So let’s extend our code to reach that goal as well.

Blocking back navigation

Back in our base class implementation, let’s add a BindableProperty. This boolean property makes it very easy to block the back navigation (no matter if you’re doing so from a ViewModel or a View):

public static BindableProperty BlockBackNavigationProperty = BindableProperty.Create("BlockBackNavigation", typeof(bool), typeof(XfNavContentPage), default(bool), BindingMode.Default, propertyChanged: OnBlockBackNavigationChanged);

private static void OnBlockBackNavigationChanged(BindableObject bindable, object oldvalue, object newvalue)
{
    //not used in this sample
    //valid scneario would be some kind of validation or similar tasks
}

public bool BlockBackNavigation
{
    get => (bool) GetValue(BlockBackNavigationProperty);
    set => SetValue(BlockBackNavigationProperty, value);
}

The next part involves once again the already overridden OnBackButtonPressed() method. If we are blocking the back navigation, we are throwing another event:

protected override bool OnBackButtonPressed()
{
    if (this.BlockBackNavigation)
    {
        BackButtonPressCanceled?.Invoke(this, EventArgs.Empty);
        return true;
    }

    base.OnBackButtonPressed();
    BackButtonPressed?.Invoke(this, EventArgs.Empty);

    if (this.StackState.isModal) 
        return true; 
    else 
    { 
       return false; 
    }
}

Notice that I added an additional step for modal pages. Without that, the hardware button back press code will be executed twice on Android on modal pages. Of course, we are rooting also the BackButtonPressCanceledevent into our ViewModel, so let’s add it to our BindingContextChanged handler:

private void XfNavContentPage_BindingContextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (this.BindingContext is XfNavViewModelBase @base)
    {
        this.Behaviors.Add(new EventToCommandBehavior()
        {
            EventName = "Appearing",
            Command = @base.ViewAppearingCommand
        });

        this.Behaviors.Add(new EventToCommandBehavior()
        {
            EventName = "Disappearing",
            Command = @base.ViewDisappearingCommand
        });

        this.Behaviors.Add(new EventToCommandBehavior()
        {
            EventName = "BackButtonPressed",
            Command = @base.BackButtonPressedCommand
        });

        this.Behaviors.Add(new EventToCommandBehavior()
        {
            EventName = "BackButtonPressCanceled",
            Command = @base.BackButtonPressCanceledCommand
        });
    }
}

To complete the code, we need to add a boolean property and the BackButtonPressCanceledCommand to our base ViewModel implementation:

private bool _blockBackNavigation;
private RelayCommand _backButtonPressCanceledCommand;

public virtual bool BlockBackNavigation
{
    get => _blockBackNavigation;

    set => Set(ref _blockBackNavigation, value);
}

public RelayCommand BackButtonPressCanceledCommand =>
    _backButtonPressCanceledCommand ?? (_backButtonPressCanceledCommand = new RelayCommand(ExecuteBackButtonPressCanceledCommand, CanExecuteBackButtonPressCanceledCommand));

public virtual void ExecuteBackButtonPressCanceledCommand() { }

public virtual bool CanExecuteBackButtonPressCanceledCommand()
{
    return true;
}

And that’s it. We already implemented everything we need in our Xamarin.Forms project.

Platform implementations

As often, we need to write some platform specific code to make our Xamarin.Forms code work in all scenarios.

Universal Windows Platform

As the Universal Windows Platforms handles the back button globally, no matter if you’re on a PC, tablet or a phone, there’s no need for additional code. Really. It’s already done with the Xamarin.Forms implementation.

Android

For the part of the hardware back button on Android devices, we are already done as well. But Android has also a software back button (eventually), which is in the toolbar (pretty similar to iOS).  There are two options we can use for Android. The first one involves just one line of code in our base page implementation’s constructor:

NavigationPage.SetHasBackButton(this, false);

This will hide the software back button on Android (and iOS as well). It would be perfectly fine on Android because all (phone and tablet) devices have a hardware back button. However, often, we do not have the possibility to go down the easy route. So let’s fully handle the toolbar button. It does not involve a lot of code, and it’s all in the MainActivity class:

protected override void OnPostCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState)
{
    var toolBar = FindViewById<Android.Support.V7.Widget.Toolbar>(Resource.Id.toolbar);
    SetSupportActionBar(toolBar);

    base.OnPostCreate(savedInstanceState);
}


public override bool OnOptionsItemSelected(IMenuItem item)
{
    //if we are not hitting the internal "home" button, just return without any action
    if (item.ItemId != Android.Resource.Id.Home)
        return base.OnOptionsItemSelected(item);

    //this one triggers the hardware back button press handler - so we are back in XF without even mentioning it
    this.OnBackPressed();
    // return true to signal we have handled everything fine
    return true;
}

The first step is to override the OnPostCreate method. Within the override, we are just setting the toolbar to be the SupportActionBar. If we would not do so, the more important override OnOptionsItemSelected would never get triggered. The back button in the toolbar has the internal resource name ‘Home’ (with a value of 16908332). If this button is hit, I am triggering the hardware back button press handler, which will get code execution routed back into the Xamarin.Formscode. By returning true we are telling Android we have handled this on our own. And that’s all we have to do in the Android project.

taking-over-back-button-android

iOS

On iOS,  a custom renderer for our XfNavContentPage is needed to get the same result. I was trying a few attempts that are floating around the web, but in the end this post was the most helpful to reach my goal also on iOS. Here is my version:

[assembly: ExportRenderer(typeof(XfNavContentPage), typeof(XfNavigationPageRenderer))] 
namespace XfMvvmLight.iOS.Renderer 
{ 
    public class XfNavigationPageRenderer : PageRenderer 
    { 
        public override void ViewWillAppear(bool animated) 
        { 
            base.ViewWillAppear(animated); 
  
            //making sure to use this only with non-modal pages 
            if (Element is XfNavContentPage page && this.NavigationController != null) 
            { 
                var thisPageIndex = page.Navigation.NavigationStack.IndexOf(page); 
                if (thisPageIndex >= 1) 
                { 
                    //disabling back swipe complettely: 
                    this.NavigationController.InteractivePopGestureRecognizer.Enabled = false; 
  
                    var backarrowImg = UIImage.FromBundle("arrow-back.png") 
                        .ImageWithRenderingMode(UIImageRenderingMode.AlwaysTemplate); 
  
                    var backButton = new UIButton(UIButtonType.Custom) 
                    { 
                        HorizontalAlignment = UIControlContentHorizontalAlignment.Left, 
                        TitleEdgeInsets = new UIEdgeInsets(11.5f, 0f, 10f, 0f), 
                        //we need to move the image a bit more left to get closer to the OS-look 
                        ImageEdgeInsets = new UIEdgeInsets(1f, -8f, 0f, 0f) 
                    }; 
  
                    //this makes sure we use the same behavior as the OS 
                    //if there is no parent, it must throw an exception because something is wrong 
                    //with the navigation structure 
                    var parent = page.Navigation.NavigationStack[thisPageIndex - 1]; 
                    backButton.SetTitle(string.IsNullOrEmpty(parent.Title) ? "Back" : parent.Title, 
                        UIControlState.Normal); 
  
                    backButton.SetTitleColor(this.View.TintColor, UIControlState.Normal); 
                    backButton.SetImage(backarrowImg, UIControlState.Normal); 
                    backButton.SizeToFit(); 
  
                    backButton.TouchDown += (sender, e) => 
                    { 
                        if (!page.BlockBackNavigation) 
                        { 
                            this.NavigationController.PopViewController(animated); 
                        } 
                        page.SendBackButtonPressed(); 
                    }; 
  
                    backButton.Frame = new CGRect(0, 0, UIScreen.MainScreen.Bounds.Width / 4, 
                        NavigationController.NavigationBar.Frame.Height); 
  
                    var view = new UIView(new CGRect(0, 0, backButton.Frame.Width, backButton.Frame.Height)); 
                    view.AddSubview(backButton); 
  
  
                    var backButtonItem = new UIBarButtonItem(string.Empty, UIBarButtonItemStyle.Plain, null) 
                    { 
                        CustomView = backButton 
                    }; 
  
                    NavigationController.TopViewController.NavigationItem 
                        .SetLeftBarButtonItem(backButtonItem, animated); 
                } 
            } 
        } 
    } 
}

Let me explain the snippet. On iOS, we do not have direct access to the back button events in the navigation bar. We are able to override the back button, though. The first thing we have to make sure is that there is a UINavigationControlleraround. This way, we are still able to use our base page class implementation and its features for modal pages. The next step is to create a button with an image (which needs to be bundled).

Of course, we want the button’s text to behave exactly like the OS one does. That’s why we are going to get the parent view. We can easily use the current view’s NavigationStackindex for that – as long as we do not have cross navigation but a continuous one. In this case, the page before the current page is our parent. If the parent’s Titleproperty is empty, we are setting the title to “Back”, pretty much the same like the OS itself does. If you want it to be empty, just add a Title to the page with ” ” as content. This works also if you do not want your MasterPagein a Xamarin.Forms.MasterDetailPage to have a visible title, btw.

The most important thing to note is the button’s TouchDownevent – which is why we are doing this whole thing. First, we manually navigate back in iOS via the PopViewControllermethod (if necessary). After that, we are once again invoking our Xamarin.Formsimplementation via the SendBackButtonPressed method of the Xamarin.Formspage, which will then trigger our EventToCommandBehavior we implemented earlier.

The last step is to create an UIViewcontainer for the button and assign it as a UIBarButtonItemto the UINavigationController via the SetLeftBarButtonItemmethod the UINavigationItem provides. And that’s it, we now also have control over the back button on iOS.

taking-over-back-button-ios

 

Lust but not least, we need to handle also the swipe-back-gesture. This can be done the hard way by disabling the gesture completelly:

//disabling back swipe complettely:
this.NavigationController.InteractivePopGestureRecognizer.Enabled = false;

I do not have an implementation for handling that in a better way, but I will update the sample with another post in this series later on. At least I have full control over the back navigation, which is (for the moment) all I need.

As always, I hope this post will be helpful for some of you. I also updated the source code of my XfMvvmLight sample on Github to match this blog post. If you have feedback or questions, sound off below in the comments or via my social channels.

Until then, happy coding, everyone!

 

Posted by msicc in Android, Dev Stories, iOS, UWP, Xamarin, 1 comment