Xamarin Forms, the MVVMLight Toolkit and I (new series) [Updated]

In this initial blog post about my new series of how I use MVVMLight with Xamarin.Forms I am showing you how to get the initial setup done, before we go into details in the following blog posts.

Updated some code parts that needed to be changed in the ViewModelLocator.

Please see also this post for upgrading the project to .netStandard:

Xamarin Forms, the MVVMLight Toolkit and I: migrating the Forms project and MVVMLight to .NET Standard



Like some of you may have already registered, I have been doing the next step and went cross platform with my personal projects. I am primarily using Xamarin Forms, because I eventually like XAML a little too much. I took a break from round about 2 years on my Xamarin usage, and I am happy to see that it has improved a lot in the meantime. While Xamarin Forms still has room for improvementes, one can do already real and serious projects with it. As I like the lightweight MVVMLight toolkit as much as I like XAML, it was a no-brainer for me to start also my recent Xamarin projects with it.

There is quite some setup stuff to do if you want get everything working from the Xamarin Forms PCL, and this post will be the first in a series to explain the way I am currently using. Some of the things I do may be against good practice for Xamarin Forms, but sometimes one has to break out of them to write code more efficiently and also maintain it easier.

Installing MVVM Light into a Xamarin Forms PCL project

Of course, we will start with a new Xamarin Forms project. After selecting the type Cross Platform App in the New Project Dialog in Visual Studio, you’ll be presented with this screen, which was introduced in the Cycle 9 Release of Xamarin:

Select Xamarin Forms as UI Technology and PCL as Code Sharing Strategy to start the solution creation. As it creates several projects, this may take some time, so you may be able to refill your coffee cup in the meantime. Once the project is created, you’ll see 4 projects:

Before we are going to write some code, we will update and add the additional packages from within the NuGet Package Manager. If your are not targeting the Android versions 7.x , Xamarin Forms is not able to use the latest Android Support libraries, so you’ll have to stick with version 23.3.0 of them (see release notes of Xamarin Forms). Since it makes sense for a new app to target the newest Android version, we’ll be updating the Android Support packages for our sample app as well.

If the NuGet Package manager demands you to restart, you’ll better follow its advise. To verify everything is ok with the updated NuGet packages, set the Android project as Startup project and let Visual Studio compile it.

If all goes well, let’s make sure we are using the right UWP compiler version for Visual Studio 2015. The .NETCORE package for the UWP needs to be of Version 5.2.x, as 5.3 is only compatible with Visual Studio 2017.

Once the packages are up to date, we’ll finally download and install MVVMLight. As we will host all of our ViewModel Logic in Xamarin Forms, together with their Views, we just need to install it into the Portable library and into the UWP project:

There will be no changes to the project except adding the reference. We need to set up the structure ourselves. First, create two new folders, View and ViewModel:

Move the MainPage into the View Folder and adjust the Namespace accordingly. The next step is to setup a ViewModelLocator class, which takes a central part of our MVVM structure. Here is what you need for the base structure:

    public class ViewModelLocator
    {
        private static ViewModelLocator _instance;
        public static ViewModelLocator Instance => _instance ?? (_instance = new ViewModelLocator());

        public void Initialize()
        {
            ServiceLocator.SetLocatorProvider(() => SimpleIoc.Default);
            RegisterServices();        

        }

        private static void RegisterServices()
        {
            //topic of another blog post
        }

        #region ViewModels  
        #endregion

        #region PageKeys
        #endregion
    }

You may notice some things. First, I am using the singleton pattern for the ViewModelLocator to make sure I have just one instance. I had some problems with multiple instances on Android, and using a singleton class helped to fix them. The second part of the fix is to move everything that is normally in the constructor into the Initialize() method. Now let’s go ahead, add a MainViewModel to the project and to the ViewModelLocator:

        public void Initialize()
        {
            ServiceLocator.SetLocatorProvider(() => SimpleIoc.Default);
            RegisterServices();
            if (!SimpleIoc.Default.IsRegistered)
                SimpleIoc.Default.Register<MainViewModel>();
        }

        #region ViewModels
        public MainViewModel MainVm => ServiceLocator.Current.GetInstance<MainViewModel>();
        #endregion

Let’s give the MainViewModel just one property which is not subject to change (at least for now):

public string HelloWorldString { get; private set; } = "Hello from Xamarin Forms with MVVM Light";

The next step is to get the App.xaml file code right, it should look like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Application xmlns="http://xamarin.com/schemas/2014/forms" 
             xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2009/xaml" 
             x:Class="XfMvvmLight.App" 
             xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008" 
             d1p1:Ignorable="d" 
             xmlns:d1p1="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"
             xmlns:forms="http://xamarin.com/schemas/2014/forms" 
             xmlns:vm="clr-namespace:XfMvvmLight.ViewModel" >
  <Application.Resources>
    <!-- Application resource dictionary -->
    <forms:ResourceDictionary xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation">
      <vm:ViewModelLocator x:Key="Locator" d:IsDataSource="True" />
    </forms:ResourceDictionary>
  </Application.Resources>
</Application>

Now that we have set up the baisc MVVM structure, we are going to connect our MainViewModel to our MainPage. There are two ways to do so.

In Xaml:

<ContentPage.BindingContext>
    <Binding Path="MainVm" Source="{StaticResource Locator}" />
</ContentPage.BindingContext>

in Code:

        public MainPage()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            this.BindingContext = ViewModelLocator.Instance.MainVm;
        }

After that, just use the HelloWorldString property of the MainViewModel as Text in the already existing Label:

    <Label Text="{Binding HelloWorldString}"
           VerticalOptions="Center"
           HorizontalOptions="Center" />

Before we are able to test our code, we need to make sure our ViewModelLocator is initialized properly:

Android:

    public class MainActivity : global::Xamarin.Forms.Platform.Android.FormsAppCompatActivity
    {
        protected override void OnCreate(Bundle bundle)
        {
            //TabLayoutResource = Resource.Layout.Tabbar;
            //ToolbarResource = Resource.Layout.Toolbar;

            base.OnCreate(bundle);

            global::Xamarin.Forms.Forms.Init(this, bundle);

            ViewModelLocator.Instance.Initialize();

            LoadApplication(new App());
        }
    }

iOS:

    [Register("AppDelegate")]
    public partial class AppDelegate : global::Xamarin.Forms.Platform.iOS.FormsApplicationDelegate
    {
        //
        // This method is invoked when the application has loaded and is ready to run. In this 
        // method you should instantiate the window, load the UI into it and then make the window
        // visible.
        //
        // You have 17 seconds to return from this method, or iOS will terminate your application.
        //
        public override bool FinishedLaunching(UIApplication app, NSDictionary options)
        {
            global::Xamarin.Forms.Forms.Init();

            ViewModelLocator.Instance.Initialize();

            LoadApplication(new App());

            return base.FinishedLaunching(app, options);
        }
    }

UWP:

//in App.xaml.cs:
        protected override void OnLaunched(LaunchActivatedEventArgs e)
        {

#if DEBUG
            if (System.Diagnostics.Debugger.IsAttached)
            {
                this.DebugSettings.EnableFrameRateCounter = true;
            }
#endif

            Frame rootFrame = Window.Current.Content as Frame;

            // Do not repeat app initialization when the Window already has content,
            // just ensure that the window is active
            if (rootFrame == null)
            {
                // Create a Frame to act as the navigation context and navigate to the first page
                rootFrame = new Frame();

                rootFrame.NavigationFailed += OnNavigationFailed;

                Xamarin.Forms.Forms.Init(e);

                ViewModelLocator.Instance.Initialize();

                if (e.PreviousExecutionState == ApplicationExecutionState.Terminated)
                {
                    //TODO: Load state from previously suspended application
                }

                // Place the frame in the current Window
                Window.Current.Content = rootFrame;
            }

            if (rootFrame.Content == null)
            {
                // When the navigation stack isn't restored navigate to the first page,
                // configuring the new page by passing required information as a navigation
                // parameter
                rootFrame.Navigate(typeof(MainPage), e.Arguments);
            }
            // Ensure the current window is active
            Window.Current.Activate();
        }

Let’s test our app on all platforms by building and deploying them:

Android

iOS Screenshot – post will be updated 

UWP

If you get the same screens, you are all set up to use Xamarin Forms with MVVMLight.

Conclusion

I know there are several specialized MVVM frameworks/toolkits floating around, which are commonly used for Xamarin Forms. As I am quite used to the MVVMLight toolkit, I prefer it over them. It is a lightweight solution, and I have more control over the code that is running than with the other options. I know I have to handle a lot of things in this case on my own (Navigation for example), but these will get their own blog posts. Starting with one of the future posts in this series, I will provide a sample app on my Github account.

If you have feedback or questions, feel free to get in contact with me via comments or on my social accounts. Otherwise, I hope this post and the following ones are helpful for some of you.

Happy coding, everyone!

12 comments

[…] Xamarin Forms, the MVVMLight Toolkit and I (new series) (Marco Siccardi) […]

[…] Xamarin Forms, the MVVMLight Toolkit and I (new series) (Marco Siccardi) […]

I started using MVVMLight and used this article as an example. I am having one issue, the Locator key in App.xaml is working fine, but I cannot get the global styles to work with the Locator xaml.

The simplest version I tried is:

But the styles are not loaded. Can you tell me how I can get the styles to load in this case?

I was able to get the styles to work after I removed the forms prefix. Locator still worked.

Yes, it works because it is a Singleton, if you use the .Instance property of it.

Hi, why if I close the app in Android by pressing the back button and reopen the app the initialize method is called again sending the app in crash because there are the instances of the classes already registered?

where does the app exactly crash? I had similar problems with the Locator, that’s why I made it a singleton. Maybe you need to clean up in OnPause() to get rid of these errors.

Hi, The app Crash because the method “protected override void OnCreate(Bundle bundle)” in the MainActivity file is called again when I lunch the app again
and since the viewmodellocator is already instanced included all the viewmodels in the SimpleIoc container when the viewmodels are registerd again I got the exception ” There is already a factory registered for myviewmodelclass ” because I think actually I don’t close the app pressing the back button on the main page.
So how I can manage this issue? Should I force to close the app? Should I check if a class in the locator has been already registered before to register it in the IOC container or to create a property in the locator class in order to check if the singleton has been already instanced?

Thanks

Now Is see the problem. You need to change the instantiation of the Services and ViewModels a bit. First, if you are using the lates version of the MvvmLightStd package, you no longer need this call:

ServiceLocator.SetLocatorProvider(() => SimpleIoc.Default);

You can follow this post to update your existing project, if necessary: https://msicc.net/xamarin-forms-the-mvvmlight-toolkit-and-i-migrating-the-forms-project-and-mvvmlight-to-net-standard/

The second part that comes into play is to ask SimpleIoc.Default if it has already an instance before creating a new one. Example:

if (!SimpleIoc.Default.IsRegistered())
    SimpleIoc.Default.Register();

This would be the same if you are using keyed instances. I will update the blog post right away with these changes as well.

HTH and regards,
Marco

Hi thanks for the answer.
Yes I’m using the latest version of the MvvmLightStd package and I didn’t use the ServiceLocator as the doc describes.So if I’ve understood well even if I put in stand by the app the method OnCreate in the Android project is called again and I have to check for each class instanced same thing in ios project I suppose.

Anyway thanks for the support.
Regards
Daniele

You have to do the additional check only in the ViewModelLocator

Yes thanks, I got It.
Bye
Daniele

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