Xamarin

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Xamarin: how to set up an Android device for Debugging

Xamarin comes with some emulators for development of an Android app. While these emulators are working and are also available in all supported screen sizes, the performance of them is really bad.

That’s why I chose debugging via device, which is a lot faster than the emulators once you have the required Xamarin extensions installed.

Here is how to set up an Android device for debugging. First thing you need to know is which OS version is running. On most Android devices, you will find this information under Settings/About (or Info)/Software information. If you don’t have the result there, you should check the manual where to find this information on your device.

Screenshot_2013-12-29-07-03-31

Activate Debugging until Android 3.2

  • go to Settings from your Application Menu
  • choose Applications
  • open the Development item
  • you will see now the option to activate USB debugging:

Android_debug_until_32

Activate Debugging on Android 4.0, 4.1

  • go to the Settings Menu
  • choose Developer options and activate USB debugging:

Android_debug_until_32

Activate Debugging on Android 4.2 and higher

  • go to the Settings Menu
  • select About
  • tap the Build Number 7 times (after the 4th tap a notification will appear that counts down the required taps)

Screenshot_2013-12-29-07-04-36

 

Installing drivers

Now our devices are ready to be connected to our PC, where we need to install the corresponding USB drivers. Normally you just need to plug in your Android device, Windows will search for the right driver and install it for you. If you want to install the driver manually, here is a list of OEM driver packages: http://developer.android.com/tools/extras/oem-usb.html#Drivers

Deploying an App for debugging

After the drivers have been installed, your device should now be recognized by Windows and also by Xamarin Studio.

Using our gettingstarted project from my first blog post, you should have now two options to deploy the application to your device:

Run With…

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Just hit ‘Debug’…

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Xamarin Studio installs now the required packages for debugging, and after that, you will be able to debug you application.

Speeding up re-deployments

Xamarin will install all developing packages including your app from scratch every time you deploy the app. To speed things up, there is an option to speed things a little up.

To activate/check if this option is already activated, click on the ‘options’ button of your project and select ‘Options’ in the context menu:

Screenshot (276)

Select ‘Android Build’ and activate these two options:

Screenshot (276)

 

This way, Xamarin will deploy only changes that have been made to your code, while keeping the required packages on your device. Xamarin Studio will detect if an update to those packages is required.

However, sometimes you will need to clean your solution and do a complete re-deploy (like you are doing with a Windows Phone project sometimes, too).

In very seldom cases (happened 3 times to me by now), you will need to uninstall your app and all of the Xamarin packages from your device. To do so, go to Settings/Apps on your device. In the application list, you will find some apps that start with ‘Mono’:

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To uninstall them, tap the items and select ‘Uninstall’ in the App info screen:

Screenshot_2013-12-29-07-58-43

 

Xamarin Studio will now re-deploy all required packages to your device, and your app should run again for debugging.

Like always, I hope this post is helpful for some of you.

Happy coding!

Posted by msicc in Android, Dev Stories, Xamarin, 2 comments

New Series: developing for Android with Xamarin

xamandroid

Prolog

In the last few month I was developing not only my personal projects, but also on my daily 9to5 job. I am working on an internal app that will help to improve the customer experience amongst the customers of my employer Telefónica.

The project has a simple setup in phase I, with collecting data and sending them via mail. The challenge for me was how to get the Windows Phone app (yes, Windows Phone was first!) to Android.

I knew it would take some time to get started with Android development, and was searching for possible solutions to speed things up. I knew from Xamarin already, and was able to obtain a 1-year license for Android (maybe iOS will follow later).

Some of my fellow WinPhans and WinPhanDevs will scream out very loud at the moment. I understand that. But honestly, I could not let go away this huge opportunity for me – as it touches both my daily job and my private developer story. To calm you down: I will always love Windows Phone and Windows and develop for it first. I will always remain a WinPhanDev. But I need to go forward, and this is a big step.

Let’s go back to the topic.

With this blog post, I am kicking off a new blogging series for Android development with Xamarin. The huge advantage of using Xamarin is that I am able to use my C# knowledge to develop apps for other platforms – which makes it a little easier to get things done.

However, if you start with another platform, you still have to learn the platform structure. Without knowing or be willing to learn it, you will be lost very fast. Every OS has its own specific UI rules, save handling and so on. This is what I will blog about.

The Windows Phone app I ported to Android has a item Pivot, which I ported over to Android. It has a little different appearance, but it works in a similar way with tapping the header or a swiping gesture to move between the items/pages.

To get there, I had to learn a lot about Android – and I will share it all with you out there.

My series will cover the following topics:

Installing Xamarin

Installing Xamarin is pretty easy – but will take some time. Click on this link to download the Xamarin IDE. The IDE will ask you for which platform you want to develop for (let’s choose only Android for the moment) and then download a huge amount of additional SDKs like the Java and the Android SDK (Android apps are Java based, if you didn’t knew).

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On the screenshot above you can see the starting page of Xamarin Studio. On the left side you have the list of recent solutions, in the middle you see Xamarin news and finally the pre-built apps section.

Xamarin Studio has a lot together with Visual Studio, and you also can take a lot of settings to adjust the appearance for your needs. Let’s start a new project by clicking on the ‘New’ button

Screenshot (270)

Xamarin will set up a .sln file with everything we need for the moment. After creating the project has been created, you’ll see these lines of code:

using System;
using Android.App;
using Android.Content;
using Android.Runtime;
using Android.Views;
using Android.Widget;
using Android.OS;

namespace gettingstarted
{
	[Activity (Label = "gettingstarted", MainLauncher = true)]
	public class MainActivity : Activity
	{
		int count = 1;

		protected override void OnCreate (Bundle bundle)
		{
			base.OnCreate (bundle);

			// Set our view from the "main" layout resource
			SetContentView (Resource.Layout.Main);

			// Get our button from the layout resource,
			// and attach an event to it
			Button button = FindViewById<Button> (Resource.Id.myButton);

			button.Click += delegate {
				button.Text = string.Format ("{0} clicks!", count++);
			};
		}
	}
}

 

These few lines should help to get started with the basic structure of an Android App.

Android has Activities. Activities can be seen as the code behind files in a C# project. Here begins all the action of an Android app. Xamarin automatically ads the Label (project name) and in this case, also the MainLauncher property, which will run this code on app start up.

To get something displayed in our app, we need to load a Layout or create the view from the code. This is what the SetContentView() method is about. Without this, the app will compile but displays nothing. In this demo app, a basic layout with a button inside is created:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:orientation="vertical"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="fill_parent">
    <Button
        android:id="@+id/myButton"
        android:layout_width="fill_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:text="@string/hello" />
</LinearLayout>

 

We already have the first difference to other C# projects here. In order to make the button visible for our code in the Activity, we need to search our resources for the button. This is done by the FindViewById<T>() method. As soon as it is visible to our code, we are able to create a delegate for our button Click event.

The button counts then the clicks on it and changes the text based on the number of clicks.

To understand more about the structure of an Android App, I highly recommend to read the documentation. For me, especially these links were helpful:

There are some more resources that are helpful, but for getting started those four links should be enough. I will cover some of the topics above also with my upcoming posts and link additional resources as well.

As with the Windows Phone development, also StackOverflow is a big help as well as the Xamarin  Android forums.

Until the next post, happy coding!

Posted by msicc in Android, Dev Stories, Xamarin, 0 comments