universal app

How to implement a simple notification system in MVVM Windows 8.1 Universal apps

screenshot_07042015_152814

If your app performs actions, you most probably want to add also some confirmation if an action has finished. There are some ways to do this, like using local toast notifications or MessageDialogs. While I was working on Voices Admin v2, which is a universal app, I came along with a helper to simplify using local toast notifications. However, there came the point, where I got annoyed by the sound of these, and I looked into possible ways to replace them. My solution is a simple notification system, that uses the MVVM Light Messenger.

The first thing I did was adding a new property that broadcasts its PropertyChangedMessage to my ExtendedViewModelBase (which inherits from the MVVM Light ViewModelBase). This simplifies setting the notification text across multiple ViewModels as I don’t need to create a property in every ViewModel of my app:

public class ExtendedViewModelBase : ViewModelBase
    {
        public ExtendedViewModelBase()
        {
            
        }


        /// <summary>
        /// The <see cref="NotificationText" /> property's name.
        /// </summary>
        public const string NotificationTextPropertyName = "NotificationText";

        private string _notificationText = string.Empty;

        /// <summary>
        /// Sets and gets the NotificationText property.
        /// Changes to that property's value raise the PropertyChanged event. 
        /// This property's value is broadcasted by the MessengerInstance when it changes.
        /// </summary>
        public string NotificationText
        {
            get
            {
                return  _notificationText = string.Empty;
            }
            set
            {
                Set(() => NotificationText, ref _notificationText, value, true);
            }
        }
   }

The second step is to create the possibility to bind this into my view. I am using a custom PageBase class to simplify this. For those binding purposes it is common to add a DependencyProperty, and this is exactly what I did:

/// <summary>
        /// global property to bind the notification text against
        /// </summary>
        public static readonly DependencyProperty AppNotificationTextProperty = DependencyProperty.Register(
            "AppNotificationText", typeof (string), typeof (PageBase), new PropertyMetadata(string.Empty, (s, e) =>
            {
                var current = s as PageBase;

                if (current == null)
                {
                    return;
                }

                current.CheckifNotificationMessageIsNeeded(s);
            }));

        /// <summary>
        /// gets or sets the AppNotificationText
        /// </summary>
        public string AppNotificationText
        {
            get { return (string)GetValue(AppNotificationTextProperty); }
            set { SetValue(AppNotificationTextProperty, value); }}

You may have noticed that I hooked up into the PropertyChangedCallback of the DependecyProperty, which passes the execution to an separate method. Before we’ll have a look on that method, we need to add two private members to my PageBase: one for a StackPanel (mainly to set the Background color) and another one for Textblock. This is needed because this is the visible part of the notification. In the constructor of my PageBase class, I am filling them with live and connect them together:

            //instantiate and create StackPanel and TextBlock
            //you can put anything you want in the panel
            _panel = new StackPanel()
            {
                Background = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Blue),
                Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed,
            };

            _textBlock = new TextBlock()
            {
                FontSize = 20,
                Margin = new Thickness(39, 10, 10, 10),
                TextAlignment = TextAlignment.Center
            };
            _panel.Children.Add(_textBlock);

The next thing we need to do is the FindChildren<T> helper method, which I took from the MSDN docs:

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets a list of DependencyObjects from the Visual Tree
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T">the type of the desired object</typeparam>
        /// <param name="results">List of children</param>
        /// <param name="startNode">the DependencyObject to start the search with</param>
        public static void FindChildren<T>(List<T> results, DependencyObject startNode) where T : DependencyObject
        {
            int count = VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(startNode);
            for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
            {
                var current = VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(startNode, i);
                if ((current.GetType()) == typeof(T) || (current.GetType().GetTypeInfo().IsSubclassOf(typeof(T))))
                {
                    T asType = (T)current;
                    results.Add(asType);
                }
                FindChildren<T>(results, current);
            }
         }

This helper enables us to find the top level grid, where we will add the StackPanel and control its visibilty and the TextBlock’s text. Which we are doing with the CheckifNotificationMessageIsNeeded() method:

        /// <summary>
        /// handles the visibility of the notification
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="currentDependencyObject">the primary depenedency object to start with</param>
        private void CheckifNotificationMessageIsNeeded(DependencyObject currentDependencyObject)
        {
            if (currentDependencyObject == null) return;

            var children = new List<DependencyObject>();
            FindChildren(children, currentDependencyObject);
            if (children.Count == 0) return;

            var rootGrid = (Grid)children.FirstOrDefault(i => i.GetType() == typeof(Grid));

            if (rootGrid != null)

                if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(AppNotificationText))
                {
                    if (!rootGrid.Children.Contains(_panel))
                    {
                        rootGrid.RowDefinitions.Add(new RowDefinition() {Height = new GridLength(_panel.ActualHeight, GridUnitType.Auto)});
                        _panel.SetValue(Grid.RowProperty, rootGrid.RowDefinitions.Count);

                        rootGrid.Children.Add(_panel);
                    }

                    _textBlock.Text = AppNotificationText;
                    _panel.Visibility = Visibility.Visible;
                }
                else if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(AppNotificationText))
                {
                    _textBlock.Text = string.Empty;
                    _panel.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed;
                }
        }

Once we have the rootGrid on our Page, we are adding a new Row, set the StackPanel’s Grid.Row property to that and finally add the StackPanel to the Grid’s Children – but only if it does not exist already. No everytime the AppNotificationText property changes, the visibility of the StackPanel changes accordingly. Same counts for the TextBlock’s text. That’s all we need to do in the PageBase class.

The final bits of code we have to add are in the MainViewModel. I am using the MainViewModel as a kind of root ViewModel, which controls values and actions that are needed across multiple ViewModels. If you do not use it in the same way, you might need to write that code in all of your ViewModels where you want to use the notifications. The biggest advantage of my way is that the notification system (and other things) also works across pages.

The first thing we need is of course a property for the notification Text, which we will use to bind against on all pages where we want to use the notification system:

        /// <summary>
        /// The <see cref="GlobalNotificationText" /> property's name.
        /// </summary>
        public const string GlobalNotificationTextPropertyName = "GlobalNotificationText";

        private string _globalNotificationText = string.Empty;

        /// <summary>
        /// Sets and gets the GlobalNotificationText property.
        /// Changes to that property's value raise the PropertyChanged event. 
        /// </summary>
        public string GlobalNotificationText
        {
            get
            {
                return _globalNotificationText;
            }
            set
            {
                Set(() => GlobalNotificationText, ref _globalNotificationText, value);
            }
        }

Now we have this, we are hooking into the MVVM Messenger to catch the broadcasted NotificationText’s PropertyChangedMessage:

            Messenger.Default.Register<PropertyChangedMessage<string>>(this, message =>
            {
                if (message.PropertyName == ExtendedViewModelBase.NotificationTextPropertyName)
                {
                }
             });

If we would stop here, you would need to find a good point to set the NotificationText (and/or the GlobalNotificationText) property back to an empty string. This can be like the search a needle in the hay, believe me. That’s why I am giving every notification 5 seconds to be displayed, and the I am resetting the GlobalNotificationText  property in my MainViewModel automatically. To achieve this goal, I am using a simple DispatcherTimer with an Interval of 1 second:

            _notificationTimer = new DispatcherTimer() { Interval = new TimeSpan(0, 0, 1) };

DispatcherTimer has a Tick event, which fires every time a Tick happened. In our case, it fires every second. Hooking up into this event is essential, so add this line of code and let Visual Studio create the handler for you:

//in constructor:       
_notificationTimer.Tick += _notificationTimer_Tick;

//generated handler:
        private void _notificationTimer_Tick(object sender, object e)
        {
        }

Inside the Tick event handler, I am counting the ticks (using a private member in my MainViewModel). Once the timer passed 5 seconds, I am stopping the DispatcherTimer, reset the counter and finally set the GlobalNotificationText  property back to empty, which causes the notification to disappear:

            _notificationTimerElapsedSeconds++;

            if (_notificationTimerElapsedSeconds > 5)
            {
                _notificationTimer.Stop();
                _notificationTimerElapsedSeconds = 0;
                GlobalNotificationText = string.Empty;
            }

Of course we also need to start the DispatcherTimer. The perfect time for this is within the handler of the received PropertyChangedMessage we added earlier:

            //register for the global NotificationText PropertyChangedMessage from all VMs that derive from ExtendenViewModelBase
            Messenger.Default.Register<PropertyChangedMessage<string>>(this, message =>
            {
                if (message.PropertyName == ExtendedViewModelBase.NotificationTextPropertyName)
                {
                    if (!_notificationTimer.IsEnabled)
                    {
                        _notificationTimer.Start();
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        _notificationTimerElapsedSeconds = 0;
                    }

                    GlobalNotificationText = message.NewValue;
                }
            });

I am just checking if the DispatcherTimer is not yet enabled (= running) and start the timer in this case. If it is already running, I am just resetting my counter property to make sure that the notification is visible for 5 seconds again.

That’s it. Your MVVM (Light) app has now a simple and not so annoying notification system. It also provides the same experience across both platforms. There are sure ways to improve this here and there, that’s why I put up a sample to play around and contribute to on my Github account.

As always, I hope this post is helpful for some of you.

Happy coding!

Posted by msicc in Dev Stories, windev, 0 comments

[Updated] String Encryption in Windows 8.1 Universal apps

image credit: Maksim Kabakou, Fotolia.com

image credit: Maksim Kabakou, Fotolia.com

[Updated: This post caused a lot of controversy and bad voices, but luckily also some constructive feedback. This is not the initial, but the updated version of this post.]

One of the goals of a Universal Windows app project is to simplify the life of our users. Microsoft provides access to RoamingSettings as well as the RoamingFolder to achieve this goal.

The usage of this storage is fairly simple (it is the same as using the local counterparts). However, one big point is how to save those settings and files securely. Nowadays, a lot of users are even more concerned about security than before, and it makes all sense to encrypt synchronized data.

This is how I came a long with a helper class string encryption. I have searched a lot throughout the Web, but apparently this is not a topic to be discussed openly but behind closed doors. I partly understand that, but I want to say thanks to Ginny Caughey at this point for her feedback on security, and also thank Joost van Schaik for his feedback that “forced” me to change my helper class to extension methods, which makes the usage more readable. If you want to learn more about Extension Methods, this link helped me to understand them and made me changing my code in about 5 minutes.

Let’s talk about security. There are two patterns for encrypting sensitive data: using symmetric algorithm and using asymmetric algorithm. The symmetric key encryption is secure, as long as you have a truly unique identifier that you can use as encryption key. Being very fast, using the symmetric algorithm is only as secure as the key that is used for encryption (obviously, I did it wrong in the first place, that’s why the code is updated). More security is achieved with the asymmetric algorithm, where a public and a private key are used for encryption. The downside of this higher level of security is that it takes longer to perform those actions. There are also more differences between those methods, but that would fill a whole book.

I have learned that on Android and iOS, often the AdvertisingId is used for such operations. Also Windows 8.1 (both phone and PC/tablet) have such an Id, provided by the AdvertisingManager class. Be aware that the id is per-user and per-device and users can switch this off or even reset their advertising id, so this is not a good idea to use. In Windows 8.1 Runtime projects (both phone and tablet/PC, we luckily have the PasswordVault class. This brings us some key advantages: the PasswordVault is encrypted and it does roam to trusted devices. This is what I am using for saving the keys, being it the symmetric one or the asymmetric ones.

Before we will have a look at my Extension methods, I have to put in a disclaimer. I am not saying that my way is the nonplus ultra way to encrypt strings. I do also not say that my way provides 100% security (which in fact does not even exist). My way provides security at a good level, but that level surely can be improved. I will take no responsibility for the security of apps that are using this.  

Let’s have a look at my Extension methods that will help you securing your data.

Symmetric Key Encryption

My symmetric encryption methods were using a pre shared key. I received a lot of feedback that this does not make any sense as it throws away the security factor, especially as the Guid can be recalculated. So I changed the method to use random data, that is generated from the CryptographiBuffer.GenerateRandom() method. Then I am putting this into an Base64 encoded string to pass it over to the PasswordVault:

        public static string GetKeyMaterialString(string resource = null, string username = null)
        {
            string key = "";

            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(resource) && string.IsNullOrEmpty(username))
            {
                //replace with your resource name if suitable
                resource = "symmetricKey";
                //replace with your user's name/identifier
                username = "sampleUserName";                                
            }            

            //using try catch as FindAllByResource will throw an exception anyways if the specified resource is not found
            try
            {
                //search for our saved symmetric key
                var findSymmetricKey = _passwordVault.FindAllByResource(resource);
                //calling RetrievePassword you MUST!
                findSymmetricKey[0].RetrievePassword();
                key = findSymmetricKey[0].Password;
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                //getting a true random key buffer with a length of 32 bytes
                IBuffer randomKeyBuffer = CryptographicBuffer.GenerateRandom(32);

                key = CryptographicBuffer.EncodeToBase64String(randomKeyBuffer); 

                _passwordVault.Add(new PasswordCredential(resource, username, key));
            }
            
            return key;
        }

The resource string as well as the username is needed to save the key into the PasswordVault. The FindAllByResource() method will throw an Exception if no credentials are found, in this case we are generating them from scratch in the catch block.

The encryption method is pretty straight forward as well. Microsoft does all the complicated calculating stuff, we just need to call the proper methods. What you get is a Base64 encoded string that easily can be saved into the ApplicationSettings or wherever you need it. Here is the complete extension method:

        public static string EncryptStringSymmetric(this string text)
        {
            string encryptedString = "";

            try
            {
                //load the alghorithm providers
                var symmetricKeyProvider = SymmetricKeyAlgorithmProvider.OpenAlgorithm(SymmetricAlgorithmNames.AesCbcPkcs7);

                //create the symmetric key that is used to encrypt the string from random keystring
                var cryptoKey = symmetricKeyProvider.CreateSymmetricKey(CryptographicBuffer.DecodeFromBase64String(GetKeyMaterialString()));

                //create the IBuffer that is for the string
                IBuffer buffer = CryptographicBuffer.CreateFromByteArray(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(text));

                //encrypt the byte array with the symmetric key
                encryptedString = CryptographicBuffer.EncodeToBase64String(CryptographicEngine.Encrypt(cryptoKey, buffer, null));

                //return the Base64 string representation of the encrypted string byte array
                return encryptedString;
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                return null;
            }

        }

 


The decryption method of course reverses all this. First, it loads the saved key from the password fault, and then decrypts and returns then the plain text string:

        public static string DecryptStringSymmetric(this string text)
        {
            string decryptedString = "";

            try
            {
                //load the alghorithm providers
                var symmetricKeyProvider = SymmetricKeyAlgorithmProvider.OpenAlgorithm(SymmetricAlgorithmNames.AesCbcPkcs7);

                //create the symmetric key that is used to encrypt the string from random keystring
                var cryptoKey = symmetricKeyProvider.CreateSymmetricKey(CryptographicBuffer.DecodeFromBase64String(GetKeyMaterialString()));

                //decode the input Base64 string
                IBuffer buffer = CryptographicBuffer.DecodeFromBase64String(text);
                //declare new byte array
                byte[] dectryptedBytes;
                //decrypt the IBuffer back to byte array
                CryptographicBuffer.CopyToByteArray(CryptographicEngine.Decrypt(cryptoKey, buffer, null), out dectryptedBytes);
                //get string back from the byte array
                decryptedString = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(dectryptedBytes, 0, dectryptedBytes.Length);

                //return plain text
                return decryptedString;
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                return null;
            }
        }

 

Both methods return null if anything did not work like excepted. This should help you to easily check if something went wrong in there. Here is how to use those methods:

Encrypting the string:

var encryptedString = stringToEncrypt.EncryptStringSymmetric();

Decrypting the string:

var dectryptedString = stringToDecrypt.DecryptStringSymmetric();

Asymmetric Key Encryption

Like I already wrote, for asymmetric encryption always two keys are used. The method to get the keys is there slightly different:

        public static Dictionary<string, string> GetAsymmetricKeyPair(string username = null)
        {
            Dictionary<string, string> keyDictionary;
            const string privKey = "asymmetricPrivateKey";
            const string pubKey = "asymmetricPublicKey";

            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(username))
            {
                //replace with your user's name/identifier 
                username = "sampleUserName";
            }

            //using try catch as FindAllByResource will throw an exception anyways if the specified resource is not found
            try
            {
                //search for our save asymmetric keys
                var findAsymmetricPrivateKey = _passwordVault.FindAllByResource(privKey);
                //calling RetrievePassword you MUST!
                findAsymmetricPrivateKey[0].RetrievePassword();
                var findAsymmetricPublicKey = _passwordVault.FindAllByResource(pubKey);
                //calling RetrievePassword you MUST!
                findAsymmetricPublicKey[0].RetrievePassword();

                //loading our keys into a new Dictionary
                keyDictionary = new Dictionary<string, string>()
                {
                    {privKey, findAsymmetricPrivateKey[0].Password},
                    {pubKey, findAsymmetricPublicKey[0].Password}
                };
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                //declaring the Key Algortihm Provider and creating the KeyPair
                var asymmetricKeyProvider =
                    AsymmetricKeyAlgorithmProvider.OpenAlgorithm(AsymmetricAlgorithmNames.RsaPkcs1);
                CryptographicKey cryptographicKeyPair = asymmetricKeyProvider.CreateKeyPair(512);

                //converting the KeyPair into IBuffers
                IBuffer privateKeyBuffer =
                    cryptographicKeyPair.Export(CryptographicPrivateKeyBlobType.Pkcs1RsaPrivateKey);
                IBuffer publicKeyBuffer =
                    cryptographicKeyPair.ExportPublicKey(CryptographicPublicKeyBlobType.Pkcs1RsaPublicKey);

                //encoding the key IBuffers into Base64 Strings and adding them to a new Dictionary
                keyDictionary = new Dictionary<string, string>
                {
                    {privKey, CryptographicBuffer.EncodeToBase64String(privateKeyBuffer)},
                    {pubKey, CryptographicBuffer.EncodeToBase64String(publicKeyBuffer)}
                };

                //saving the newly generated keys in PasswordVault
                //it is recommended to save the both keys separated from each other, though
                _passwordVault.Add(new PasswordCredential(privKey, username, keyDictionary[privKey]));
                //_passwordVault.Add(new PasswordCredential(pubKey, username, keyDictionary[pubKey]));
            }

            //return new Dictionary
            return keyDictionary;
        }

As you can see, I am creating a Dictionary that holds the two keys so we can work with. I also use another key generating method, specially made for asymmetric encryption. I store those two keys separated from each other into the PasswordVault in the end.

The encryption follows basically the same structure as the symmetric key encryption method. Due to the fact I already have two different keys, I think this is ok for the scenario of passing values between the Windows Phone and Windows  project. Eventually I will change that in future when I see the need for it. Notice that for encryption, always the public key is used. The public key should also be saved separated from the private key. So here is the complete method:

        public static string EncryptStringAsymmetric(this string text, string publicKey = null)
        {
            //making sure we are providing a public key
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(publicKey))
            {
                var keyPairs = GetAsymmetricKeyPair();
                publicKey = keyPairs["asymmetricPublicKey"];
            }

            try
            {
                //converting the public key into an IBuffer
                IBuffer keyBuffer = CryptographicBuffer.DecodeFromBase64String(publicKey);
                
                //load the public key and the algorithm provider
                var asymmetricAlgorithmProvider = AsymmetricKeyAlgorithmProvider.OpenAlgorithm(AsymmetricAlgorithmNames.RsaPkcs1);
                var cryptoKey = asymmetricAlgorithmProvider.ImportPublicKey(keyBuffer, CryptographicPublicKeyBlobType.Pkcs1RsaPublicKey);

                //converting the string into an IBuffer
                IBuffer buffer = CryptographicBuffer.CreateFromByteArray(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(text));

                string encryptedString = "";

                //perform the encryption
                encryptedString = CryptographicBuffer.EncodeToBase64String(CryptographicEngine.Encrypt(cryptoKey, buffer, null));

                //return the Base64 string representation of the encrypted string
                return encryptedString;
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                return null;
            }

        }

The decryption of the encrypted string works also in a similar way to the symmetric one, except we are using the private key of our asymmetric key pair. To be able to do this, we need to use the ImportKeyPair method, whose name is a bit misleading in my opinion. In fact, we even need to specify that we want to import the private key and not the whole key pair. But even with that, decryption works like expected:

        public static string DecryptStringAsymmetric(this string text, string privateKey = null)
        {
            //making sure we are providing a public key
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(privateKey))
            {
                    var keyPairs = GetAsymmetricKeyPair();
                privateKey = keyPairs["asymmetricPrivateKey"];
            }

            try
            {
                //converting the private key into an IBuffer
                IBuffer keyBuffer = CryptographicBuffer.DecodeFromBase64String(privateKey);

                //load the private key and the algorithm provider
                var asymmetricAlgorithmProvider = AsymmetricKeyAlgorithmProvider.OpenAlgorithm(AsymmetricAlgorithmNames.RsaPkcs1);
                var cryptoKey = asymmetricAlgorithmProvider.ImportKeyPair(keyBuffer, CryptographicPrivateKeyBlobType.Pkcs1RsaPrivateKey);

                //converting the encrypted text into an IBuffer
                IBuffer buffer = CryptographicBuffer.DecodeFromBase64String(text);

                //cdecrypting the IBuffer and convert its content into a Byte array 
                byte[] decryptedBytes;
                CryptographicBuffer.CopyToByteArray(CryptographicEngine.Decrypt(cryptoKey, buffer, null), out decryptedBytes);

                string decryptedString = "";

                //getting back the plain text 
                decryptedString = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(decryptedBytes, 0, decryptedBytes.Length);

                return decryptedString;
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                return null;
            }
        }

Like the symmetric methods, also the asymmetric methods return null if something went wrong. Here is how to use them:

Encrypting the string:

var encryptedString = stringToEncyrpt.EncryptStringAsymmetric();

Decrypting the string:

var decryptedString = stringToDecrypt.DecryptStringAsymmetric();

As you can see, securing strings does not have to be more complicated than this. Using the PasswordVault, we have a truly secure place to store the keys (that need to be saved privately and secure), the rest is done by the methods provided by the operating system. I am by far not a security researcher or expert, but this class should provide a good level of security for string encryption in Windows 8.1 universal apps.

If you know more about security or have ideas to improve this helper class, I put up a sample project on Github where you also can play around with the class and the simple app I created for it. Feel free to contribute to this class or discuss in the comments below.

Happy coding, everyone!

Posted by msicc in Dev Stories, windev, 3 comments

How to implement a bindable progress indicator (loading dots) for MVVM Windows (8.1) Universal apps

Screenshot (23)

Now that I am on a good way to understand and use the MVVM pattern, I am also finding that there are some times rather simple solutions for every day problems. One of these problems is that we don’t have a global progress indicator for Windows Universal apps. That is a little bit annoying, and so I wrote my own solution. I don’t know if this is good or bad practice, but my solution is making it globally available in a Windows Universal app. The best thing is, you just need to bind to a Boolean property to use it. No Behaviors, just the one base implementation and Binding (Yes, I am a bit excited about it). For your convenience, I attached a demo project at the end of this post.

To get the main work for this done, we are implementing our own class, inherited from the Page class. The latter one is available for Windows as well as Windows Phone, so we can define it in the shared project of our Universal app. To do so, add a new class in the shared project. I named it PageBase (as it is quite common for this scenario, as I found out).

First, we need to inherit our class from the Page class:

public abstract class PageBase : Page

Now that we have done this, we need a global available property that we can bind to. We are using a DependencyProperty to achieve this goal. To make the property reflect our changes also to the UI, we also need to hook into a PropertyChanged callback on it:

        //this DepenedencyProperty is our Binding target to get all the action done!
        public static readonly DependencyProperty IsProgressIndicatorNeededProperty = DependencyProperty.Register(
            "IsProgressIndicatorNeeded", typeof (bool), typeof (PageBase), new PropertyMetadata((bool)false, OnIsProgressIndicatorNeededChanged));

        public static void OnIsProgressIndicatorNeededChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {

        }

        //get and send the value of our Binding target
        public bool IsProgressIndicatorNeeded
        {
            get { return (bool) GetValue(IsProgressIndicatorNeededProperty); }
            set { SetValue(IsProgressIndicatorNeededProperty, value); }
        }

The next step we need to do is to find the UIElement we want the progress indicator to be in. To do so, we are going through the VisualTree and pick our desired element. This helper method (taken from the MSDN documentation) will enable us to find this element:

        //helper method to find children in the visual tree (taken from MSDN documentation)
        private static void FindChildren<T>(List<T> results, DependencyObject startNode)
          where T : DependencyObject
        {
            int count = VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(startNode);
            for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
            {
                var current = VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(startNode, i);
                if ((current.GetType()) == typeof(T) || (current.GetType().GetTypeInfo().IsSubclassOf(typeof(T))))
                {
                    T asType = (T)current;
                    results.Add(asType);
                }
                FindChildren<T>(results, current);
            }
        }

The method goes through the VisualTree, starting at the point we are throwing in as DependecyObject and gives us a List<T> with all specified Elements. From this List we are going to pick our UIElement that will hold the progress indicator for us. Let’s create a new method that will do all the work for us:

        private void CheckIfProgressIndicatorIsNeeded(DependencyObject currentObject)
        {
        }

Notice the DependencyObject parameter? This makes it easier for us to use the method in different places (which we will, more on that later). Let’s get our list of DependencyObjects from our parameter and pick the first Grid as our desired UIElement to hold the progress indicator:

            if (currentObject == null) return;

            //getting a list of all DependencyObjects in the visual tree
            var children = new List<DependencyObject>();
            FindChildren(children, currentObject);
            if (children.Count == 0) return;

            //getting a reference to the first Grid in the visual tree
            //this can be any other UIElement you define
            var rootGrid = (Grid)children.FirstOrDefault(i => i.GetType() == typeof(Grid));

Now that we have this, we are already at the point where we need to create our progress indicator object.  I declared a class member of type ProgressBar (which needs to be instantiated in the constructor then). This is how I set it up:

            //setting up the ProgressIndicator
            //you can also create a more complex object for this, like a StackPanel with a TextBlock and the ProgressIndicator in it
            _progressIndicator.IsIndeterminate = IsProgressIndicatorNeeded;
            _progressIndicator.Height = 20;
            _progressIndicator.VerticalAlignment = VerticalAlignment.Top;

The final step in the PageBase class is to check if there is already a chikd of type ProgressBar, if not adding it to the Grid and setting it’s Visibility property to Visible if our above attached DependencyProperty has the value ‘true’:

            //showing the ProgressIndicator
            if (IsProgressIndicatorNeeded)
            {
                //only add the ProgressIndicator if there isn't already one in the rootGrid
                if (!rootGrid.Children.Contains(_progressIndicator))
                {
                    rootGrid.Children.Add(_progressIndicator);
                }
                _progressIndicator.Visibility = Visibility.Visible;
            }

If the value is ‘false’, we are setting the Visibility back to collapsed:

            //hiding the ProgressIndicator
            else
            {
                if (rootGrid.Children.Contains(_progressIndicator))
                {
                    _progressIndicator.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed;
                }
            }

Now that we have this method in place, let’s go back to our callback method we have been hooking into earlier. To reflect the changes that we are throwing into our DependencyProperty,  we are calling our method within the PropertyChanged callback. To do so, we are getting a reference to the PageBase class, which is needed because we are in a static method. Once we have this reference, we are calling our method to show/hide the progress indicator:

        public static void OnIsProgressIndicatorNeededChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            //resolving d as PageBase to enable us calling our helper method
            var currentObject = d as PageBase;

            //avoid NullReferenceException
            if (currentObject == null)
            {
                return;
            }
            //call our helper method
            currentObject.CheckIfProgressIndicatorIsNeeded(d);
        }

That’s all, we are already able to use the global progress indicator. To use this class, you need to do a few things. First, go to the code-behind part of your page. Make the class inherit from the PageBase class:

    public sealed partial class MainPage : PageBase

Now, let’s go to the XAML part and add a reference to your class:

    xmlns:common="using:MvvmUniversalProgressIndicator.Common"

Once you have done this, replace the ‘Page’ element with the PageBase class:

<common:PageBase>
//
</common:PageBase>

After you have build the project, you should be able to set the Binding to the IsProgressIndicatorNeeded property:

    IsProgressIndicatorNeeded="{Binding IsProgressIndicatorVisible}">

If you now add two buttons to the mix, binding their Commands to change the value of the Boolean property, you will see that you can switch the loading dots on and off like you wish. That makes it pretty easy to use it in a MVVM driven application.

But what if we need to show the progress indicator as soon as we are coming to the page? No worries, we are already prepared and need only a little more code for that. In the PageBase class constructor, register for the Loaded event:

            Loaded += PageBase_Loaded;

In the Loaded event, we are calling again our main method to show the progress indicator, but this time we use the current window content as reference to start with:

        void PageBase_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            //using the DispatcherHelper of MvvmLight to get it running on the UI
            DispatcherHelper.CheckBeginInvokeOnUI(() =>
            {
                //Window.Current.Content is our visual root and contains all UIElements of a page
                var visualRoot = Window.Current.Content as DependencyObject;
                CheckIfProgressIndicatorIsNeeded(visualRoot);
            });

        }

As we need to reflect changes on the UI thread, I am using the DispatcherHelper of the MvvmLight Toolkit. You can use your own preferred method as well for that. That’s all, If you now test it with setting the IsProgressIndicatorNeeded property in your page directly to ‘True’ in XAML, you will see the loading dots right from the start.

Screenshot (21)

Like always, I hope this is helpful for some of you.

Happy coding!

Download Sample project

Posted by msicc in windev, 1 comment

Helper class to easily display local toast notifications (Windows Universal app)

Often , we need to display a confirmation that some action in our app has been finished (like some data has been updated etc.). There are several ways of doing this, like displaying a MessageBox or MessageDialog. This however breaks the user interaction, and a lot of users will start complaining on that if your app keeps doing so. There needs to be a better way.

With the Coding4fun Toolkit floating around, you can mimic a toast notification – sadly only on Windows Phone (at least for the moment, but Dave told me he will work on implementing it for Windows, too). Also, Toastinet library is floating around, which is also able to mimic the toast notification behavior (although for Windows Universal app, the implementation is not that intuitive as for Windows  Phone). Both are fantastic libraries that I used in the past, but I wanted a solution that is implemented easily and works with my Universal app. So I did some searching in the Web and the MSDN docs, and found out that is pretty easy to use the system toast notifications on both platforms locally.

There are 8 possible ways to format toast notifications (as you can see here in the toast template catalog). This gives us pretty much options on how a notification can be styled. However, most options just work on Windows 8.1, while Windows Phone 8.1 apps will only show the notification in the way “app logo”  “bold text”  “normal text”. However, the notification system takes care of that, so you can specify some other type on Windows 8.1, while knowing that it gets converted on Windows Phone automatically. This allows us to write a helper class that implements all possible options without any headache.

the code parts for the notification

Let’s have a look at the code parts for the notification. First, you need to add two Namespaces to the class:

using Windows.Data.Xml.Dom;
using Windows.UI.Notifications;

After that, we can start writing our code. Toast notifications are formatted using Xml. Because of this, we need to get a reference to the underlying Xml template for the system toast notification:

ToastTemplateType xmlForToast= ToastTemplateType.ToastImageAndText01; 
XmlDocument toastXml = ToastNotificationManager.GetTemplateContent(xmlForToast);

System toast notifications can hold Text (and an Image on Windows 8.1). So we need to declare the elements of the toast notification. We are using the Xml methods of the DOM namespace to get the text elements of the chosen template first:

XmlNodeList toastTextElements = xmlForToast.GetElementsByTagName("text");
toastTextElements[0].AppendChild(xmlForToast.CreateTextNode("text1"));
//additional texts, depending on the template:
//toastTextElements[1].AppendChild(xmlForToast.CreateTextNode("text2"));
//toastTextElements[2].AppendChild(xmlForToast.CreateTextNode("text3"));

This is how the image element is implemented:

XmlNodeList toastImageElement = xmlForToast.GetElementsByTagName("image");
//setting the image source uri:
if (toastImageElement != null) ((XmlElement) toastImageElement[0]).SetAttribute("src", imageSourceUri);
//setting optional alternative text for the image
if (toastImageElement != null)  ((XmlElement) toastImageElement[0]).SetAttribute("alt", imageSourceAlternativeText);

You can attach local or remote images to the toast notification, but remember this works only on Windows, not on Windows Phone.

The next part we are able to set is the duration. The duration options are long (25 seconds) and short (7 seconds). The default is short, which should be ok for most scenarios. Microsoft recommends to use long only when a personal interaction of the user is needed (like in a chat). This is how we do it:

IXmlNode toastRoot = xmlForToast.SelectSingleNode("/toast");
((XmlElement) toastRoot).SetAttribute("duration", "short");

What we are doing here is to get the root element of the template’s Xml and add a new element for the duration. Now that we finally have set all options, we are able to create our toast notification and display it to the user:

ToastNotification notification = new ToastNotification(xmlForToast);
ToastNotificationManager.CreateToastNotifier().Show(notification);

the helper class

That’s all we need to do for our local notification. You might see that always rewriting the same code just makes a lot of work. Because the code for the toast notification can be called nearly everywhere in an app (it does not matter if you are calling it from a ViewModel or code behind), I wrote this helper class that makes it even more easy to use the system toast notification locally:

    public class LocalToastHelper
    {
        public void ShowLocalToast(ToastTemplateType templateType, string toastText01, string toastText02 = null, string toastText03 = null, string imageSourceUri = null, string imageSourceAlternativeText = null, ToastDuration duration = ToastDuration.Short)
        {
            XmlDocument xmlForToast = ToastNotificationManager.GetTemplateContent(templateType);
            XmlNodeList toastTextElements = xmlForToast.GetElementsByTagName("text");

            switch (templateType)
            {
                case ToastTemplateType.ToastText01:
                case ToastTemplateType.ToastImageAndText01:
                    toastTextElements[0].AppendChild(xmlForToast.CreateTextNode(toastText01));
                    break;
                case ToastTemplateType.ToastText02:
                case ToastTemplateType.ToastImageAndText02:
                    toastTextElements[0].AppendChild(xmlForToast.CreateTextNode(toastText01));
                    if (toastText02 != null)
                    {
                        toastTextElements[1].AppendChild(xmlForToast.CreateTextNode(toastText02));
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        throw new ArgumentNullException("toastText02 must not be null when using this template type");
                        
                    }
                    ;
                    break;
                case ToastTemplateType.ToastText03:
                case ToastTemplateType.ToastImageAndText03:
                    toastTextElements[0].AppendChild(xmlForToast.CreateTextNode(toastText01));
                    if (toastText02 != null)
                    {
                        toastTextElements[1].AppendChild(xmlForToast.CreateTextNode(toastText02));
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        throw new ArgumentNullException("toastText02 must not be null when using this template type");
                    }
                    ;
                    break;
                case ToastTemplateType.ToastText04:
                case ToastTemplateType.ToastImageAndText04:
                    toastTextElements[0].AppendChild(xmlForToast.CreateTextNode(toastText01));
                    if (toastText02 != null)
                    {
                        toastTextElements[1].AppendChild(xmlForToast.CreateTextNode(toastText02));
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        throw new ArgumentNullException("toastText02 must not be null when using this template type");
                    }
                    ;
                    if (toastText03 != null)
                    {
                        toastTextElements[2].AppendChild(xmlForToast.CreateTextNode(toastText03));
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        throw new ArgumentNullException("toastText03 must not be null when using this template type");
                    }
                    ;
                    break;
            }

            switch (templateType)
            {
                case ToastTemplateType.ToastImageAndText01:
                case ToastTemplateType.ToastImageAndText02:
                case ToastTemplateType.ToastImageAndText03:
                case ToastTemplateType.ToastImageAndText04:
                    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(imageSourceUri))
                    {
                        XmlNodeList toastImageElement = xmlForToast.GetElementsByTagName("image");
                        if (toastImageElement != null)
                            ((XmlElement) toastImageElement[0]).SetAttribute("src", imageSourceUri);
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        throw new ArgumentNullException(
                            "imageSourceUri must not be null when using this template type");
                    }
                    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(imageSourceUri) && !string.IsNullOrEmpty(imageSourceAlternativeText))
                    {
                        XmlNodeList toastImageElement = xmlForToast.GetElementsByTagName("image");
                        if (toastImageElement != null)
                            ((XmlElement) toastImageElement[0]).SetAttribute("alt", imageSourceAlternativeText);
                    }
                    break;
                default:
                    break;
            }

            IXmlNode toastRoot = xmlForToast.SelectSingleNode("/toast");
            ((XmlElement) toastRoot).SetAttribute("duration", duration.ToString().ToLowerInvariant());

            ToastNotification notification = new ToastNotification(xmlForToast);
            ToastNotificationManager.CreateToastNotifier().Show(notification);
        }

        public enum ToastDuration
        {
            Short,
            Long
        }
    }

As you can see, you just need to provide the wanted parameters to the ShowLocalToast method, which will do the rest of the work for you.

One word to the second switch statement I am using. The image element needs to be set only when we are using the ToastImageAndTextXX templates. There are three ways to implement the integration: using an if with 4  “or” options, the switch statement I am using or a string comparison with String.Contains. The switch statement is the cleanest option for me, so I decided to go this way. Feel free to use any of the other ways in your implementation.

In my implementation, I added also some possible ArgumentNullExceptions to make it easy to find any usage errors.

For your convenience, I attached the source file. Just swap out the namespace with yours. Download

The usage of the class is pretty simple:

var _toastHelper = new LocalToastHelper();
_toastHelper.ShowLocalToast(ToastTemplateType.ToastText02, "This is text 1", "This is text 2");

audio options

The system toasts have another option that can be set: the toast audio. This way, you can customize the appearance of the toast a bit more. I did not implement it yet, because there are some more options and things to remind, and I haven’t checked them out all together. Once I did, I will add a second post to this one with the new information.

As always, I hope this is helpful for some of you.

Happy coding!

Posted by msicc in Dev Stories, windev, 3 comments

How to create an Extended Splashscreen for Universal Apps

Recently, I started to create a real world app to demonstrate the usage of my WordPressUniversal library. While I was working on it, I also decided to extend the Splahscreen which is mandatory for universal apps.There are several reasons to extend the splash screen, the most obvious is to hide initial data loading.

The only sample I found had a separate solution for the Windows and the Windows Phone application, and I decided to put them together to use the advantages of the Shared project that comes with every universal app.

The first step is to add your Splashscreen images to both projects. To do so, open their Package.appxmanifest files and go to the ‘Visual Assets’ tab. Add your images:

Screenshot (371)

Now add a UserControl to your shared project and rename the control type to “Grid” in the XAML file. After that, let us design the UI that is shown to the user when he starts our app:

<Grid.RowDefinitions>
    <RowDefinition/>
    <RowDefinition Height="180"/>
</Grid.RowDefinitions>

<!--Windows needs a Canvas-->
<Canvas x:Name="Win_Splash_Img" 
        Grid.Row="0" 
        Grid.RowSpan="2" 
        Visibility="Collapsed">
    <Image x:Name="extendedSplashImage_Win" 
           Source="Assets/SplashScreen.png"/>
</Canvas>

<!--Windows Phone needs a Viewbox-->
<Viewbox 
    x:Name="WP_Splash_Img"
    Grid.Row="0" Grid.RowSpan="2" 
    Visibility="Collapsed">
    <Image x:Name="extendedSplashImage_WP" 
           Source="Assets/SplashWindowsPhone.png"/>
</Viewbox>

<!--this StackPanel holds our ProgressRing that is telling the user we are doing some work-->
<StackPanel 
    Grid.Row="1" 
    HorizontalAlignment="Center">
    <ProgressRing x:Name="progressRing" 
                  IsActive="True" Margin="0,0,0,12" 
                  Foreground="White" 
                  Background="Black">            
    </ProgressRing>
    <TextBlock x:Name="progressText" 
               Style="{StaticResource TitleTextBlockStyle}" 
               TextAlignment="Center" 
               HorizontalAlignment="Center">
 </TextBlock>
</StackPanel>

This XAML code is the base for our extended Splashscreen. It defines a row height of 180 to place the StackPanel that holds the ProgressRing at the bottom of our control. The main difference here is that Windows Apps use a Canvas while Windows Phone uses Viewbox to hold our Splashscreen Image. We need to set the Visibility on both to collapsed as our code decides which one will be displayed on Launch.

In our code page, we have a bit more work to do. Let’s go through it step by step:

Make sure you have added the following Namespaces:

using Windows.ApplicationModel.Activation;
using Windows.UI.Core;
using ExtendedSplash.Common;

Note: if you do not have a Common folder in your Shared Project, you can add it manually and copy the classes from the demo project attached to this project. Don’t forget to change the Namespaces of the classes to your project name after you added them.

The next step is to declare some objects that we need for the extended Splashscreen:

internal Rect splashImageRect; 
internal bool dismissed = false; 
internal Frame rootFrame;
private SplashScreen splash;

The Rect is used to place the Splashscreen Image in it and will be sized by our code which we will add later. The dismissed bool is used to determine when the system Splashscreen gets dismissed. The rootFrame is used for the navigation to our first application page, while the splash is used to read the needed values for placing our image into the Rect.

After we have declared those objects, we need to overload the main class of our control:

public ExtendedSplash(SplashScreen splashcreen, bool loadstate)

The splashcreen tells us the coordinates and the height of the splash image. You can use the loadstate bool to determine data that needs to be restored by the SuspensionManager, if needed.

As users are snapping our apps or rotating the device, we need to handle this. To do so, we need to add the following line to our constructor:

Window.Current.SizeChanged += new WindowSizeChangedEventHandler(ExtendedSplash_OnResize);

Add this code to handle the resizing:

if (splash != null)
{
    splashImageRect = splash.ImageLocation;
    PositionImage();
}

If the user causes the WindowSizeChanged event to fire, the splash will be loaded again and submits new coordinates to our splash object. To properly handle the positioning, we are using the PositionImage() method:

        void PositionImage()
        {
#if WINDOWS_PHONE_APP
            extendedSplashImage_WP.SetValue(Viewbox.HeightProperty, splashImageRect.Height);
            extendedSplashImage_WP.SetValue(Viewbox.WidthProperty, splashImageRect.Width);
#else
            extendedSplashImage_Win.SetValue(Canvas.LeftProperty, splashImageRect.X);
            extendedSplashImage_Win.SetValue(Canvas.TopProperty, splashImageRect.Y);
            extendedSplashImage_Win.Height = splashImageRect.Height;
            extendedSplashImage_Win.Width = splashImageRect.Width;
#endif
        }

As you can see, we use the preprocessor directive WINDOWS_PHONE_APP to declare the height and width of the Viewbox. If it is not running on Windows Phone, we are setting the canvas coordinates and size via this method. This is not the only point where we need this method, as you will see later in this post.

Let’s go back to our constructor and add this line to load the system’s Splashscreen values into our object:

splash = splashcreen;

Now that we have these values, we are finally able to receive the coordinates and declare which Splashscreen will be used:

            if (splash != null)
            {
                //handle the dismissing of the system's splash 
                splash.Dismissed += new TypedEventHandler<SplashScreen, Object>(DismissedEventHandler);

                //get the system's splashscreen values
                splashImageRect = splash.ImageLocation;

                //decide which control is used to display the splashscreen image and size the progressRing
#if WINDOWS_PHONE_APP
                Win_Splash_Img.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed;
                WP_Splash_Img.Visibility = Visibility.Visible;
                progressRing.Height = 50;
                progressRing.Width = 50;

#else
                Win_Splash_Img.Visibility = Visibility.Visible;
                WP_Splash_Img.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed;
                progressRing.Height = 70;
                progressRing.Width = 70;
#endif
                //position and size the image properly
                PositionImage();

            }

 

Let me explain what I have done here. First we need to check if our splash object has a value. Then, we need to handle the Dismissing of the system’s Splashscreen with this TypedEventHandler:

private void DismissedEventHandler(SplashScreen sender, object args)
{
    dismissed = true;
}

After that, I am declaring when to show Windows Phone’s Viewbox and Windows’ Canvas as well as setting the size of the ProgressRing. The last step is to position and size the image again with our PositionImage() method. This will cause the app to switch to our extended Splashscreen.

Now we have to declare a new Frame instance and begin to load our data:

// this frame acts as navigation context
rootFrame = new Frame();
//start loading your data:
LoadData();

For this demo, I used a delay to keep the ProgressRing spinning:

async void LoadData()
{
    progressText.Text = "sleeping, please wait until I wake up...";
    //using a delay to keep the progress ring spinning for this demo
    await Task.Delay(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));
    //Navigate to the first application page after all work is done
    rootFrame.Navigate(typeof(MainPage));
    Window.Current.Content = rootFrame;
}

That’s all of the code we need inside our ExtendSplash control. If you now build the project, it will compile, but nothing will happen. other than going directly to the MainPage.

We need to add some additional code to our App.xaml.cs in the OnLaunched event:

//only show the splash if the app wasn't running before
if (e.PreviousExecutionState != ApplicationExecutionState.Running)
{
    //check the loadstate if necessary
    bool loadState = (e.PreviousExecutionState == ApplicationExecutionState.Terminated);
    //create a new instance of our ExtendedSplash
    ExtendedSplash extendedSplash = new ExtendedSplash(e.SplashScreen, loadState);
    //declare our extendedSplash as root content
    rootFrame.Content = extendedSplash;
}

If you hit the debug button, you should have similar results to these:

Screenshot (374)

Screenshot (375)

For your convenience, I created a small demo project. Download it here.

As always, I hope this blog post is helpful for some of you. If you have questions or feedback, feel free to leave a comment below.

Posted by msicc in Dev Stories, windev, 8 comments